Your medical professional may recommend Zoloft if you have certain mental health conditions. Zoloft is a brand-name prescription medication prescribed to treat the following conditions:

We provide more information about these conditions and how Zoloft is used to treat them in the “Do you take Zoloft for anxiety?” and “Do you take Zoloft for other conditions?” sections below.

Zoloft details

Zoloft contains the active drug sertraline, which belongs to a class of antidepressant drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). A drug class is a group of medications that work the same way.

Zoloft comes as tablets and as a liquid solution. Both forms of Zoloft are taken by mouth.

Zoloft is available as the generic medication sertraline. A generic medication is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics are considered to be as safe and effective as brand-name drugs. Generics also tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

You can learn more about how generics compare with brand-name versions in this article.

Most medications, including Zoloft, may cause side effects that can be serious or mild. To give you an idea of what might occur with Zoloft, we’ve listed some of the medication’s more common side effects below. It’s important to note that we haven’t included all the potential side effects.

For more complete information on possible side effects of Zoloft, you can talk with your medical professional or pharmacist. They may also be able to recommend tips on how to help prevent and ease side effects.

Note: Certain factors may affect a medication’s side effects, including how long side effects last. These factors can include other health conditions you may have, other drugs you may be taking, and your age.

Mild side effects

Some of the mild side effects that Zoloft may cause are listed below. For information on other mild side effects of the drug, we suggest that you talk with your medical professional or pharmacist. It may also be helpful to refer to the medication guide for Zoloft.

Mild side effects of Zoloft that have been reported in studies include:

Mild side effects of many drugs tend to lessen in a couple of days or a few weeks. But if you find that the side effects bother you, you can talk with your medical professional or pharmacist.

* For details about this side effect, you can see “Side effects: A closer look” below.
† The “Side effects specific to women and men” section just below has details about possible sexual side effects of Zoloft.

Serious side effects

Zoloft may cause serious side effects, but this isn’t common. If you do develop serious side effects while taking Zoloft, be sure to call your medical professional immediately. If you feel as if you’re having a medical emergency, it’s important to call 911 (or your local emergency number) right away.

Serious side effects of Zoloft that have been reported in studies include:

* For details about this side effect, you can see “Side effects: A closer look” below.

Side effects specific to women and men

Some side effects of Zoloft may be more common in males* than in females.*

For example, sexual side effects of Zoloft can vary between males and females. Males taking Zoloft may experience:

  • erectile dysfunction (inability to get or maintain an erection)
  • problems with ejaculation or inability to ejaculate

In both males and females taking Zoloft, a decrease in libido (low sex drive) was also reported, although it wasn’t common. More males reported decreased libido than females.

If you have questions about your risk for side effects of Zoloft, you can talk with your medical professional.

* Throughout this article, we refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth by using the terms “male” and “female.” To learn about the difference between sex and gender, you can refer to this article.

Side effects in the first week of treatment

Mild side effects may occur during the first few days you take Zoloft. Typically, these side effects go away with time as you continue taking the drug. There aren’t any side effects that occur specifically only during the first week of Zoloft treatment.

Side effects: A closer look

This section provides a close-up look at key side effects of Zoloft.

Boxed warning

Zoloft has a boxed warning, which is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The boxed warning appears on the drug’s label and alerts you to possible serious risks.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults. Antidepressants such as Zoloft may raise the risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and in adults 24 years and younger. This risk may be highest during the first few months of taking Zoloft, and whenever the drug’s dosage is adjusted.

Major depressive disorder and other mental health conditions that Zoloft treats can also cause suicidal thoughts and behaviors. No suicides were reported in any children or adolescents in studies of Zoloft.

It’s also important to note that Zoloft is approved for use in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who are 6 years and older. Otherwise, Zoloft can only be used in adults.

Tips for managing

It’s recommended that you watch for any changes, especially sudden changes, to your behaviors, feelings, moods, or thoughts while you’re taking Zoloft. It’s advised that you call your medical professional right away if you experience any of the following symptoms:

If you’re comfortable telling someone close to you about your treatment, consider asking them to keep an eye out for any noticeable changes in your mood or behavior. This person could be a family member or a friend. If you have questions about this boxed warning, you’re encouraged to talk with your medical professional.

Tiredness

Tiredness was one of the most common side effects reported by people taking Zoloft in clinical studies.

You’re more likely to have tiredness if you’re taking Zoloft for major depressive disorder or pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder. In studies, people taking Zoloft to treat major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or panic disorder were more likely to stop Zoloft because of tiredness.

Tips for managing

Tiredness as a side effect from Zoloft may go away on its own after a few days or weeks.

If you feel tiredness that bothers you or won’t go away while taking Zoloft, you can talk with your medical professional. They may suggest ways to help improve your energy levels. And if this side effect won’t go away, they may recommend trying a treatment other than Zoloft for your condition.

Headache

It’s possible to have headaches as a side effect of Zoloft. This was commonly reported in clinical studies of the drug.

Headache can also be a symptom of hyponatremia (low blood sodium levels). This is a rare but serious side effect of Zoloft. Or if you suddenly stop taking Zoloft, headache could be a symptom of discontinuation syndrome. But it’s important to talk with your medical professional if you’re considering stopping Zoloft. Together, the two of you can discuss your treatment options.

Tips for managing

If you have headaches with Zoloft, they may go away after a few days or weeks of taking the drug.

If you have headaches that bother you or don’t go away while taking Zoloft, you can talk with your medical professional. They may recommend headache treatments that are safe for you. They may also want to make sure your headaches aren’t a sign of a more serious condition, such as hyponatremia. It’s also possible that your medical professional may recommend a treatment other than Zoloft for your condition.

Allergic reaction

Many drugs, including Zoloft, can cause an allergic reaction.

Symptoms that can occur with a mild allergic reaction may include:

  • itchiness
  • skin rash
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction may also occur, but this is rare. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction may include swelling of your mouth, tongue, or throat, which may cause trouble breathing. You may also experience swelling under your skin, often in your lips, eyelids, hands, or feet.

Tips for managing

If you have symptoms of an allergic reaction to Zoloft, it’s important to call your medical professional immediately. If you feel as if you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 (or your local emergency number) right away.

Your medical professional will advise you on how much Zoloft to take and how often. Commonly used dosages are mentioned below, but it’s important to always take the dosage your medical professional recommends.

Forms and strengths

Zoloft comes as tablets and as a liquid solution. Both forms are taken by mouth. They’re available in the following strengths:

  • Zoloft tablets:
    • 25 milligrams (mg)
    • 50 mg
    • 100 mg
  • Zoloft solution:
    • 20 mg per milliliter (mg/mL)

Recommended dosages

Below we describe recommended dosages of Zoloft for the conditions it’s approved to treat, including information about what’s considered a high dose of Zoloft:

  • Social anxiety disorder. For social anxiety disorder, the recommended starting dose of Zoloft is 25 milligrams (mg) once per day. Your medical professional may increase your dose week by week, if needed. Zoloft’s maximum dose for treating social anxiety is 200 mg once per day.
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). To treat OCD in adults and children 13 years and older, the recommended starting dose of Zoloft is 50 mg once per day. For children 6 to 12 years old, the recommended starting dose is 25 mg once per day. If needed, your medical professional may increase your dose weekly. The maximum dose of Zoloft for OCD treatment is 200 mg once per day.
  • Major depressive disorder (MDD). For MDD, the recommended starting dose of Zoloft is 50 mg once per day. Your medical professional may increase your dose each week if necessary. Zoloft’s maximum dose for treating MDD is 200 mg once per day.
  • Panic disorder. For panic disorder, the recommended starting dose of Zoloft is 25 mg once per day. Your medical professional may increase your dose weekly as needed. The maximum dose of Zoloft for treating panic disorder is 200 mg once per day.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). For PTSD, the recommended starting dose of Zoloft is 25 mg once per day. Your medical professional may increase your dose weekly if needed. The maximum dose of Zoloft for treating PTSD is 200 mg once per day.
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). For PMDD, your medical professional may prescribe continuous dosing, meaning that you’ll take Zoloft every day. Or they may prescribe intermittent dosing, which means you’ll only take Zoloft during the luteal phase* of your menstrual cycle.
    • With continuous dosing, you’ll start with the lowest Zoloft dose, which is 50 mg once per day. Over time, your medical professional may increase your dosage up to the maximum of 150 mg per day.
    • With intermittent dosing, you’ll start with the lowest dose of 50 mg once per day, taken only during the luteal phase* of your cycle. Over time, your medical professional may increase your dosage up to the maximum of 100 mg per day.

* The luteal phase of the menstrual cycle is the time after ovulation and before your period begins.

Some important things to discuss with your medical professional when considering treatment with Zoloft include:

  • your overall health
  • all medical conditions you have
  • all medications you take

Below, we discuss these considerations in more detail.

Interactions

Taking certain drugs, foods, vaccines, and other substances with a medication may affect how that medication works. These effects are known as interactions.

Before you take Zoloft, let your medical professional know about any other drugs you take. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medications. It’s also important to mention any herbs, supplements, and vitamins you may use. Your medical professional or pharmacist can tell you about possible interactions these substances may have with Zoloft.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

Zoloft can interact with several types of drugs. These drugs include:

Keep in mind that we haven’t listed all types of drugs that may interact with Zoloft. Your medical professional or pharmacist can provide more details as well as information on other possible interactions.

Other interactions

The supplement St. John’s wort also interacts with Zoloft. Both Zoloft and St. John’s wort can increase levels of the chemical serotonin in your body. So, taking them together can increase your risk for serotonin syndrome. This is a rare but serious side effect in which you have too much serotonin in your body.

Taking Zoloft can also cause a false-positive result on certain urine drug screening tests. The false positive may be for a type of drug called benzodiazepines. (False positive means the test shows a certain drug or type of drug is present in your body when it isn’t really there.) A false positive can happen even if it’s been several days since your last dose of Zoloft.

If you’re taking Zoloft and you need to have a urine drug test, it’s helpful to talk with your medical professional. Some types of drug tests don’t produce a false positive when you’re taking Zoloft, and your medical professional can help with this.

FDA boxed warning

Zoloft has a boxed warning, which is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The boxed warning appears on the drug’s label and alerts you to possible serious risks.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults. Antidepressants such as Zoloft may raise the risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and in adults 24 years and younger. This risk may be highest during the first few months of taking Zoloft, and whenever the drug’s dosage is adjusted.

For details, see “Side effects: A closer look” in the “Does Zoloft have side effects?” section above.

Other warnings

If you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health, Zoloft may not be the right choice for you. Before you take Zoloft, it’s important to discuss your health history with your medical professional. The list below includes some factors to consider.

  • Prolonged QT interval. Taking Zoloft may affect a part of your heart rhythm called the QT interval. If you have a prolonged QT interval or have been diagnosed with long QT syndrome, or if you’re at risk for a prolonged QT interval, it may not be safe for you to take Zoloft. Be sure that your medical professional is aware of any heart rhythm problems you have before you take Zoloft.
  • Liver problems. If you have liver problems, you may be prescribed a lower dosage of Zoloft than usual. Or if your liver problems are severe, Zoloft may not be safe for you to take. Your medical professional can determine whether your liver is healthy enough for treatment with Zoloft.
  • Bleeding problems. Zoloft can increase your risk for bleeding. Your risk may be higher if you already have a bleeding problem. It’s recommended that you talk with your medical professional before you take Zoloft if you have any bleeding problems.
  • Bipolar disorder depression. Zoloft isn’t approved to treat bipolar disorder depression. If you have this condition, Zoloft may increase your risk for mania or hypomania (episodes of extreme happiness or excitement). Your medical professional will likely screen you for bipolar disorder depression before you start Zoloft. And if you have episodes of depression caused by bipolar disorder, be sure your medical professional knows this before you start taking Zoloft.
  • Angle-closure glaucoma. Zoloft can rarely cause your pupils (the black part of your eye) to dilate (get bigger). This can lead to a condition called closed-angle glaucoma (also called angle-closure glaucoma). Your risk for this condition is higher if you already have narrow eye angles. Before you start taking Zoloft, your medical professional might recommend having an eye exam. (Open-angle glaucoma isn’t a risk factor for having dilated pupils as a side effect of Zoloft, however.)
  • Low blood sodium levels. Zoloft can cause hyponatremia (low blood levels of sodium). Older adults (age 65 and older) and people who take a diuretic (also called a water pill) may be at higher risk for hyponatremia. And if you already have this condition, taking Zoloft could make it worse. Your medical professional can help determine whether Zoloft is safe for you to take if you have low blood sodium levels.
  • Seizure disorder. It’s not known whether Zoloft is safe for use in people with a seizure disorder. If you experience seizures or have a seizure disorder, let your medical professional know about this before starting Zoloft. They can help determine whether Zoloft is safe for you.
  • Latex allergy (Zoloft oral solution only). Zoloft solution comes with a dropper for measuring your dose. This dropper contains latex. Your medical professional may ask if you have a latex allergy before you begin taking Zoloft. If you have a latex allergy, they’ll make sure you get a form of the drug that’s safe for you to use.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Zoloft or any of its ingredients, you should not take Zoloft. Your medical professional can recommend other treatments that might be better choices for you.

Zoloft and alcohol

If you drink alcohol, it’s recommended that you minimize how much you drink while you’re taking Zoloft.

Both alcohol and Zoloft can cause some similar side effects, including:

  • sexual problems
  • headache
  • diarrhea
  • upset stomach

Combining the two could increase your risk for side effects or make these side effects worse. Also keep in mind that alcohol can cause liver damage. If your liver becomes damaged, you may need to take a lower dose of Zoloft than usual. You may even have to stop taking the drug if the damage is severe.

Your medical professional can help you figure out how much alcohol is safe for you to have while taking Zoloft.

Note: If you’re prescribed the Zoloft oral solution, it’s important to know that it contains 12% alcohol.

Zoloft use while pregnant or breastfeeding

It’s not known if Zoloft is safe to use while pregnant. Some studies have shown that Zoloft could cause pregnancy complications, but more research is needed to confirm this. If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, it’s important to tell your medical professional about this before you take Zoloft. It’s also recommended that you contact your medical professional right away if you get pregnant while taking Zoloft.

Zoloft is known to pass into breast milk, but it hasn’t been shown to cause side effects in breastfed children. We recommend talking with your medical professional about the risks and benefits of feeding options for your child.

Weight gain wasn’t reported as a side effect in clinical studies of Zoloft. But weight loss has been reported in clinical studies with children taking Zoloft.

Also, adults and children have reported decreased appetite as a side effect of Zoloft. Decreased appetite could lead to weight loss. It’s important to keep in mind that some of the conditions Zoloft is used to treat, such as major depressive disorder and pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder, can also cause appetite changes.

Zoloft can cause side effects that could make it harder to exercise, such as tiredness and problems sleeping. But tiredness, sleep problems, and other factors that affect energy levels may also be caused by the conditions Zoloft is used to treat.

If you have concerns about weight changes with Zoloft, your medical professional can recommend ways to help maintain a weight that’s healthy for you.

If you suddenly stop taking Zoloft (also known as stopping “cold turkey”), you could experience discontinuation syndrome. These are withdrawal symptoms that can occur after stopping selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Zoloft. Weaning off Zoloft (gradually decreasing your dosage) over time can help prevent side effects of stopping Zoloft.

Withdrawal symptoms after suddenly stopping Zoloft can include:

  • nausea
  • excessive sweating
  • mood changes, including feeling more agitated, anxious, or irritated
  • dizziness
  • feeling a burning, prickling, or “electric shock” sensation (usually in your arms, feet, or legs)
  • tremors (shaking you can’t control)
  • confusion
  • headache
  • tiredness
  • trouble sleeping
  • tinnitus (ringing in your ears)
  • seizures

Because stopping Zoloft can cause discontinuation syndrome, it’s very important that you don’t suddenly stop taking Zoloft. Instead, you and your medical professional will work together to lower your dosage slowly over time. This is called a drug taper.

It’s important to note that Zoloft isn’t a controlled substance, and is not addictive. Controlled substances are medications that have high potential for misuse or for being addictive. (With misuse, a drug is taken differently than how it’s prescribed. With addiction, a drug continues to be taken even if it’s causing harm.)

If you’re interested in stopping Zoloft, it’s advised that you speak with your medical professional. They can help plan a drug taper that’s specific to you and your dosage. It’s important to not stop taking Zoloft without first speaking with your medical professional.

Both Zoloft and Lexapro (escitalopram) belong to a group of antidepressant drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The drugs work in similar ways. They may be prescribed to treat some of the same conditions, as well as some different conditions.

This table compares conditions Zoloft and Lexapro are approved to treat:

To learn more about how Zoloft and Lexapro are alike and different, see this comparison article. You can also talk with your medical professional or pharmacist.

If you have MDD, there are also other alternatives to Zoloft for treating MDD in addition to Lexapro. These drugs include:

If you’re wondering about alternatives to Zoloft, such as Lexapro, your medical professional or pharmacist can provide more information.

Both Zoloft and Prozac (fluoxetine) belong to a group of antidepressant drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These drugs work in similar ways. They can be prescribed to treat some of the same conditions, as well as some different ones.

This table compares conditions Zoloft and Prozac are approved to treat:

Conditions Zoloft is approved to treatConditions Prozac is approved to treat
Major depressive disorderMajor depressive disorder
Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
Panic disorderPanic disorder
Pre-menstrual dysphoric disorderPre-menstrual dysphoric disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)Bulimia nervosa
Social anxiety disorderBinge eating disorder
Bipolar disorder depression
Treatment-resistant depression

In addition to being approved to treat some different conditions, Zoloft and Prozac have some other differences as well. To learn more about the similarities and differences between Zoloft and Prozac, you can refer to this comparison article. You can also talk with your medical professional or pharmacist.

Your medical professional can help explain how to take Zoloft. It’s important to follow the instructions your medical professional provides.

Tips for taking Zoloft

Below we provide some tips for how each form of Zoloft should be taken.

Zoloft oral solution

If you’re prescribed Zoloft oral solution, you’ll need to dilute it (mix it with another liquid) before each dose. To do this, you’ll use the dropper that comes with your solution to measure your dose. Then you’ll mix the solution with 4 ounces (about ½ cup) of one of the following:

  • water
  • lemon or lime soda
  • ginger ale
  • lemonade
  • orange juice

You’re advised to not mix Zoloft oral solution with any liquid except one of those listed above. The mixed solution may look slightly hazy or cloudy, which is normal.

Zoloft tablets

If you’re prescribed Zoloft tablets, it’s recommended that you swallow the tablet(s) with a full glass of water.

Taking Zoloft with other drugs

Depending on the condition you’re using Zoloft to treat, you may be prescribed only Zoloft. Or you may be prescribed Zoloft along with other drugs.

Your medical professional can answer additional questions you may have about taking Zoloft with other drugs.

Frequently asked questions about taking Zoloft

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Zoloft treatment:

  • How long does Zoloft take to work? In clinical studies, researchers didn’t measure how long it took Zoloft to start working for any of the conditions it’s approved to treat. You may notice improvements in your symptoms within 2 weeks, or it may take longer for your symptoms to get better. Some people need to take drugs such as Zoloft for up to 8 weeks before the drug begins to noticeably reduce symptoms. You can talk with your medical professional or pharmacist if you have more questions about how long Zoloft takes to work.
  • What’s the best time of day to take Zoloft? There’s no best time of day to take Zoloft. People in clinical studies took their dose in the morning or evening. It’s recommended that you take your Zoloft dose at the time that works best for you, or at the time your medical professional advises. It’s also best to take Zoloft at about the same time each day.
  • What should I do if I miss a dose of Zoloft? If you miss a dose of Zoloft, try and take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next dose, it’s recommended that you skip the missed dose and take your next scheduled dose. Do not take two doses to try and make up for the missed dose. This could increase your risk for side effects.
  • Is Zoloft meant for long-term use? If you and your medical professional agree Zoloft is working well to treat your condition, you’ll likely take it long-term.
  • Can you chew, split, or crush Zoloft tablets? You can split Zoloft tablets, as long as the tablets have a score (an indented line in the middle of the tablet). But it’s recommended that you talk with your pharmacist before chewing or crushing Zoloft to make sure this is safe.
  • Should you take Zoloft with food? You may take Zoloft with or without food.
What should you ask your medical professional?

It’s common to have questions about your treatment plan for Zoloft. Your medical professional is there to work with you and help address any concerns you have.

To help guide your discussion, here are some suggestions:

  • Try writing down questions you have before your visit. For example, “How will taking Zoloft affect my mood, body, and lifestyle?”
  • Think about asking a loved one or friend to come with you to your appointment. Having in-person support may help you feel more at ease.
  • Keep in mind that if your medical professional says something that’s unclear, you can always ask them to explain it.

Working with your healthcare team may help you stay on track with your treatment. The team wants you to get the best care possible.

Zoloft is approved to some types of anxiety, specifically:

  • Social anxiety disorder. Zoloft is used to treat social anxiety disorder in adults. This condition causes fear or anxiety involving social situations. You may fear being scrutinized or judged negatively by others.
  • Panic disorder. Zoloft can be used to treat panic disorder in adults. This is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks that are unexpected and that keep happening. Panic attacks are a sudden and intense surge of fear, often with a sense of lacking control over what’s happening. These often occur without a specific trigger.

It’s not entirely understood how Zoloft works to treat anxiety, but it may work by affecting the balance of certain chemicals in your brain.

Your medical professional or a pharmacist can provide more details about taking Zoloft to treat anxiety.

In addition to certain types of anxiety, Zoloft is also approved to treat the following conditions:

  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Zoloft is prescribed to treat OCD in adults, as well as children ages 6 years and older. With OCD, you have obsessions (intrusive thoughts that cause discomfort) and compulsions (actions that help relieve the stress and discomfort brought on by obsessions).
  • Major depressive disorder (MDD). Zoloft is prescribed to treat MDD in adults. MDD may also simply be called “depression.” MDD causes feelings like anger, loss, and sadness that interfere with your daily life on most days. Other symptoms can include digestive problems, trouble concentrating, and feeling more tired than usual.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Zoloft can be used to treat PTSD in adults. This condition is caused by exposure to a perceived or real threat. PTSD may cause you to re-experience a traumatic event over and over again. This may cause symptoms such as nightmares, intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, and intense feelings of guilt or sadness.
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Zoloft is used to treat PMDD in adults. With PMDD, you have symptoms that begin just before your period, and end when your period ends. Symptoms may include depressed mood, feeling very agitated or anxious, and being more angry or irritated than usual. Changes in sleep and appetite can also be symptoms.

Your medical professional or a pharmacist can help you if you have questions about taking Zoloft for any of the above conditions.

Below we share answers to some commonly asked questions about Zoloft.

What’s the half-life of Zoloft?

Zoloft’s half-life is about 26 hours. A drug’s half-life is the amount of time it takes for the body to get rid of half of a dose of the drug.

26 hours is considered a long half-life. Because of this long half-life, it may take a few days before you notice any differences caused by an adjustment in your Zoloft dosage. For this reason, your medical professional likely won’t change your Zoloft dosage more than once per week, if needed.

If you have more questions about Zoloft’s half-life, you can talk with your medical professional.

How does Zoloft work?

Zoloft belongs to a class of antidepressant medications called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). (A drug class is a group of medications that work in the same way.)

Serotonin is a chemical that your body makes naturally. It’s thought to affect behavior, mood, and memory. Drugs such as Zoloft are believed to work by increasing levels of serotonin in your body.

To learn more about how Zoloft works, you can talk with your medical professional.

Is it safe to use cannabis while taking Zoloft?

It’s not known whether it’s safe to use cannabis (also known as marijuana or weed) while taking Zoloft.

A recent study found that using cannabis while taking a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) such as Zoloft may increase your risk for side effects from the SSRI. These side effects can include tiredness, diarrhea, and dizziness. But more data is needed about potential effects of cannabis use with Zoloft treatment.

If you have questions about cannabis and how it may impact your treatment, your medical professional can provide more details.

Can I take melatonin during my Zoloft treatment?

It’s important to talk with your medical professional or pharmacist before you take any medication or supplement with Zoloft, including melatonin.

Zoloft and melatonin aren’t known to interact, so they might be safe to take together. But your medical professional or pharmacist will check whether melatonin may interact with other medications you take or other medical conditions you may have.

It’s important that you don’t take more Zoloft than your medical professional recommends. Taking more than the recommended dosage can lead to severe side effects.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by an overdose can include:

  • agitation
  • dizziness
  • fast or slow heart rate
  • nausea and vomiting
  • sleepiness
  • tremors (shaking you can’t control)

What to do in case you take too much Zoloft

If you believe you’ve taken too much Zoloft, call your medical professional right away. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use its online resource. If your symptoms are severe, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the closest emergency room.

Zoloft is a prescription drug. The prices of prescription medications may depend on several factors, such as your insurance coverage and the pharmacy you use. To find current prices for Zoloft tablets or oral solution near you, you can visit GoodRx.com.

Zoloft is available as a generic drug called sertraline. A generic is a copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic may cost less than the brand-name drug. Your medical professional can help determine whether the generic form of Zoloft may be an option for you.

If you’re wondering how to pay for Zoloft, you can talk with your medical professional or pharmacist. You may also want to visit the website of Zoloft’s manufacturer to see if support options are available.

If you still have questions about Zoloft after reading this article, we recommend that you talk with your medical professional. Together you can decide if Zoloft might be a good choice for you.

You can also discuss other treatments, forms of support, and resources that may benefit you. We’ve listed some helpful suggestions below.

Additional treatment options

While you take Zoloft, additional treatments or remedies may help you better manage your condition. These can include:

Finding support

Whether you’re looking for a therapist, support group, or information on how to afford therapy, these resources may help:

Other resources

To receive weekly information on mental health, you may want to sign up for the Psych Central newsletter. You’ll find stories directly from other people on their mental health journey as well as the latest information on treatments.

Disclaimer: Psych Central has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.