Depression News

Young Blacks from Better Homes May See More Discrimination, Higher Depression Risk

December 21st, 2014
A new study has found that higher parental education, which has a protective effect for white youth, actually increases the risk of depression for black youth. The study, from researchers at the MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC), also found that, among high-socioeconomic-status black ...

Why Antidepressants May Worsen Symptoms Before Kicking In

December 18th, 2014
Emerging research helps explain the delayed, even paradoxical effect of certain antidepressants. Clinicians have known that some medications may actually worsen symptoms before helping patients feel better. The new findings, publishing online in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, may eventually help investigators fix ...

Hugs, Social Support Shown to Protect Against Stress & Illness

December 18th, 2014
New research suggests hugs may be the tonic for reducing stress and preventing infections. Carnegie Mellon University researchers tested whether hugs act as a form of social support, protecting stressed people from getting sick. Their findings, as published in the journal Psychological Science, found ...

Work Burnout Linked to Atypical Depression

December 16th, 2014
New research suggests a strong link between being disenchanted by work and depression. City College of New York psychology professor Dr. Irvin Schonfeld studied more than 5,500 school teachers to estimate the prevalence of depressive disorders in workers with burnout. He discovered 90 percent ...

Boosting Dementia Caregivers’ Mental Health

December 16th, 2014
People caring for relatives with dementia may benefit from a brief coping strategies therapy, new research suggests. There are more than 15 million family carers of people with dementia in the U.S. Clinical depression, anxiety, or other substantial psychological symptoms are common ...

Friends’ Support for Victimized Teens Has Pros and Cons

December 11th, 2014
Researchers from the University of Kansas find in a new study that there are pros and cons to the support victimized teenagers get from their friends. Depending on the type of aggression they are exposed to, such support may reduce young people's risk ...

Safe, Walkable Neighborhoods Enhance Mental Health in Older Latinos

December 10th, 2014
Older Latinos living in the U.S. who feel that their neighborhoods are safe and walkable exhibit fewer symptoms of depression, and the effect may be long-term, according to a new study by the University of Illinois. “Many times we look at individual-level factors ...

Laughing Gas for Depression?

December 10th, 2014
A new study finds that a drug that makes people laugh may also reduce their depression. A pilot study has found that nitrous oxide, or "laughing gas," may be a potential treatment option for treatment resistant severe depression. Researchers at Washington University School of ...

Half of U.S. Kids Face Harmful Events That Can Impact Health, School

December 9th, 2014
Nearly half of all children in the United States experience an adverse event during childhood that could lead to long-term health or educational consequences, according to new research. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say the experiences -- including ...

Animal Studies May Help Explain Postpartum Disorders

December 9th, 2014
A new study suggests an expanded research agenda on animals could help to improve knowledge on human psychiatric conditions that occur after birth. Experts say that in the days shortly after giving birth, mothers often experience a period of increased calmness and decreased ...