Psychology & Mental Health News

Updated every weekday by the Psych Central News Staff.


F E A T U R E D    A R T I C L E
Substance Abuse Treatment Cuts Violence Risk In Severely Mentally Ill

Substance Abuse Treatment Cuts Violence Risk In Severely Mentally Ill

October 2nd, 2014
A new study suggests treating the substance abuse problems of those with severe mental illness can reduce their risk of future violence. Severe mental illness is often accompanied by substance abuse. In these cases, it is often difficult to determine if interventions ...

Personality Traits May Impact Alzheimer’s Risk in Women

Personality Traits May Impact Alzheimer’s Risk in Women

October 2nd, 2014
A long-term study suggests a woman’s disposition during middle age may influence her risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Researchers discovered women who are anxious, jealous, or moody and distressed may be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life. The ...
Full-Court Press Aims to Tame Mean Teen Girls

Full-Court Press Aims to Tame Mean Teen Girls

October 2nd, 2014
Relational aggression by adolescent girls can include gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion, and rejection. Recent media coverage of this behavior -- sometimes known as “mean girl” bullying -- has shown that this form of aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. University of ...
Weight Training Can Enhance Memory

Weight Training Can Enhance Memory

October 2nd, 2014
A new study suggests resistance exercises can boost brain power. Georgia Tech researchers discovered that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory -- also known as long-term memory for events -- by about 10 percent ...
Alcohol Lets Men Respond More Easily to Smiles

Alcohol Lets Men Respond More Easily to Smiles

October 1st, 2014
Drinking alcohol appears to foster a sort of "social bravery" among men, enabling them to be more responsive to the smiles of others. Researchers discovered that for men, alcohol increases male’s sensitivity to rewarding social behaviors like smiling. This finding may help to ...
U.S. Military Lessens Stigma of Mental Illness, Promotes Treatment

U.S. Military Lessens Stigma of Mental Illness, Promotes Treatment

October 1st, 2014
An independent study by the RAND Corporation discovers the U.S. Department of Defense has made progress in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help for mental illness. Nevertheless, although the culture surrounding conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder has ...
Study Implicates Depression Screens in Overprescribing Meds

Study Implicates Depression Screens in Overprescribing Meds

October 1st, 2014
Although the general belief is that many cases of depression go untreated, new research suggests short questionnaires used to identify patients at risk for depression may lead to overprescribing of antidepressant medications. The new research from University of California, Davis Health ...
Study Finds Rise in Bodily Symptoms of Depression

Study Finds Rise in Bodily Symptoms of Depression

October 1st, 2014
New research shows Americans now report more psychosomatic symptoms of depression, such as trouble sleeping and trouble concentrating, than their counterparts in the 1980s. San Diego State University researchers analyzed data from 6.9 million adolescents and adults from all over the ...
New Method Can Predict Susceptibility to Stress

New Method Can Predict Susceptibility to Stress

October 1st, 2014
Although stress can increase the risk of poor mental or physical health, not everyone is affected the same way. Researchers now report they have developed a way to identify those most susceptible to stress, creating an opportunity for interventions before it gets ...
Study Probes Anorexia in Males

Study Probes Anorexia in Males

September 30th, 2014
New research suggests male anorexia is similar to female anorexia although the male disorder is associated with personality and gender identity issues. Although anorexia is traditionally associated with females, the disorder also occurs among boys and men. University of Montreal researchers embarked ...
After-School Exercise Can Aid Attention, Cognition in Preteens

After-School Exercise Can Aid Attention, Cognition in Preteens

September 30th, 2014
New research suggests an after-school physical activity program of moderate to intense exercise can improve seven, eight, and nine year-olds' attention span and cognitive abilities. For the study, researchers performed a nine-month-long, randomized controlled trial involving 221 prepubescent children. They found that ...
Self-Compassion Trumps Self-Esteem for Body Image

Self-Compassion Trumps Self-Esteem for Body Image

September 30th, 2014
Researchers have discovered that self-compassion can protect girls and young women from unhealthy weight-control practices and eating disorders. University of Waterloo investigators discovered women who accept and tolerate their imperfections appear to have a more positive body image despite their body ...
Caffeine Beats Music for Driving Alertness

Caffeine Beats Music for Driving Alertness

September 30th, 2014
For many, drowsiness or fatigue when behind the wheel is combated by drinking caffeinated beverages or by listening to music. New research evaluates which method, if either, can successfully combat driver fatigue. Human factors/ergonomics researchers ShiXu Liu, Shengji Yao, Ph.D., and Allan Spence, ...
Decision Analysis Aimed at Informed Choices on Breast Reconstruction

How Do You Make an Informed Choice About Breast Reconstruction?

September 29th, 2014
A new process borrowed from the business sector helps women evaluate alternatives for breast reconstruction, using a decision analysis technique. The approach helps surgeons and patients evaluate alternatives for breast reconstruction, leading to a good decision that reflects the woman's preferences and values. The ...
Autistic Kids Inactive, Yet Similar Fitness Levels to Peers

Kids with Autism Inactive, Yet Similar Fitness Levels to Peers

September 29th, 2014
New research discovers that children with autism are more sedentary and inactive than their developing peers. Oregon State University investigators found that children with autism averaged 50 minutes less a day of moderate physical activity and 70 minutes more each ...
Retention in Elementary School Can Leave Lasting Scars

Retention in Elementary School Can Leave Lasting Scars

September 29th, 2014
A provocative new study suggest the practice of retaining children in primary grades may have unintended consequences. Student retention is when a child is "held back" from graduating to the next grade at the end of the school year. It's often ...
Study Points to Neural Basis for Social Deficits in ADHD Kids

Study Points to Neural Basis for Social Deficits in ADHD Kids

September 29th, 2014
New research finds evidence of differences in brain function in kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that may underlie problems recognizing emotion in facial expressions. Children with ADHD frequently exhibit inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. These behaviors may explain why they are often excluded from peer activities, ...
Lifelong Cycle of Obesity, Poverty in Women

Lifelong Cycle Seen of Obesity, Poverty in Women

September 28th, 2014
Teen girls from poor families are at greater risk than boys for becoming overweight or obese, and, in turn, adult obesity results in further socioeconomic difficulties, suggesting a lifelong cycle, according to a new study from the University of Texas ...
Family-Based Therapy Preferred Treatment for Teenage Anorexia

Family-Based Therapy Preferred for Teen Anorexia

September 28th, 2014
A new study shows that family-based therapies are twice as effective as individual therapy at combating anorexia nervosa in teenagers. The study, which compares two different family-based therapies, adds to a growing body of evidence supporting the value of parents' involvement ...
Coaching COPD Patients on Coping Helps Boost Quality of Life

Coaching COPD Patients on Coping Helps Boost Quality of Life

September 28th, 2014
Coaching patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on how to manage stress, practice relaxation, and participate in light exercise can boost a patient's quality of life, improving both mental and physical health, according to a new study. About 15 million ...