Trichotillomania Symptoms

By Psych Central Staff

Trichotillomania is primarily characterized by the recurrent pulling out of one’s own hair. Hair pulling may occur from any region of the body — such as your scalp, eyelids or eyebrows. Less common areas where trichotillomania occurs includes pulling out facial hair, pulling out hair from your arms, legs, armpits, or pubic hair. Hair pulling sites may vary over time.

The prevalence of this disorder is approximately 1 – 2 percent of the population. It occurs more frequently in females than males (10:1 ratio).

Specific Symptoms of Trichotillomania

1. Recurrent pulling out of one’s hair resulting in noticeable hair loss.

2. Repeated attempts to decrease or stop the hair pulling.

3. The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

4. The disturbance is not better accounted for by another mental disorder (such as trying to improve a perceived defect or flaw in body dysmorphic disorder) and is not due to a general medical condition (e.g., a dermatological condition).

 

Updated for DSM-5. Code: 312.39 (F63.2)

 

 

APA Reference
Psych Central. (2013). Trichotillomania Symptoms. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 29, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/disorders/trichotillomania-symptoms/

Symptom criteria summarized from:
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.
        or
American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Scientifically Reviewed
    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 3 Nov 2013
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.