Rett’s Disorder Symptoms

By Psych Central Staff

The essential feature of Rett’s Disorder is the development of multiple specific deficits in a child following a period of normal functioning after birth. Individuals have an apparently normal prenatal and perinatal period with normal psychomotor development through the first 5 months of life. Head circumference at birth is also within normal limits.

Rett’s Disorder is typically associated with Severe or Profound Mental Retardation.

Specific Symptoms of Rett’s Disorder

All of the following:

  • Apparently normal prenatal and perinatal development
  • Aapparently normal psychomotor development through the first 5_months after birth
  • Normal head circumference at birth

Onset of all of the following after the period of normal development:

  • A deceleration of head growth between ages 5 and 48 months
  • Loss of previously acquired purposeful hand skills between ages 5 and 30 months with the subsequent development of stereotyped hand movements (e.g., hand-wringing or hand washing)
  • Loss of social engagement early in the course (although often social interaction develops later)
  • Appearance of poorly coordinated gait or trunk movements
  • Severely impaired expressive and receptive language development with severe psychomotor retardation

 

 

APA Reference
Psych Central. (2013). Rett’s Disorder Symptoms. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 30, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/disorders/retts-disorder-symptoms/

Symptom criteria summarized from:
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.
        or
American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Scientifically Reviewed
    Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 26 May 2013
    Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.