Avoid These 5 Traps that Can Destroy Your Good Habits

by Gretchen Rubin

mousetrapAvoid these five habit traps — they can destroy your good habits.

When we’re trying to master our habits, it’s important to be aware of the justifications or arguments that we sometimes invoke that interfere with keeping a good habit.

They slip in so easily and quickly, it can be hard to spot them.

 

Plagued with Low Self-Esteem? You Might Suffer from ‘The Uncertainty Curse’

by Anneli Rufus

Woman staring and appearing to be a in a nervous and depressed state

Few states of mind are more synonymous with low self-esteem than uncertainty.

People with medium or high self-esteem are confident and secure. This confidence and security might wane a bit under stress, but it bounces back eventually: a basic, taken-for-granted assumption that one is okay, that one is capable and, often as not, correct.

That’s what differentiates us from them.

 

Why ADHD is Misunderstood

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Why ADHD is MisunderstoodAttention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is regularly misunderstood. In fact, some believe that ADHD doesn’t even exist. One reason is the media. Some media perpetuate the myth that pharmaceutical companies created ADHD in order to cash in, said Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach.

“This couldn’t be further from the truth,” she said. “ADHD has been identified in medical books way before the advent of ADHD medications.”

 

Happy Thanksgiving 2014

by John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

Happy Thanksgiving 2014In America, we celebrate a day of thanks today, so Happy Thanksgiving to everyone (no matter where you might live)! This is our 19th year celebrating a Thanksgiving with you, and for that we are extremely thankful.

Like many, I too like to spend this time of the year reflecting on my gratitude and appreciation for all of the good things I have in my life. I am especially appreciative and grateful for the non-materialistic things — things like my family (all of whom are in good health and spirits), my friends, my online buddies, and my colleagues from around the world.

I am also grateful for all of the good that so many people have done to help change the message about mental health… From one of shame and embarrassment, to one of hope, science and illumination.

 

How to Cope with Pain from the Past

by Lauren Suval

How to Cope with Pain from the PastOne of my favorite quotes, referenced in a piece on Tiny Buddha, states:

“If you get lost in a trigger that thrusts you to a painful event, take a deep breath and remember: we can’t change that we’ve been hurt before, but we can choose not to suffer now.”

That sentiment — that we can’t change the past, but we can choose not to suffer now — struck a chord. I’ve been through many emotional downs in previous relationships (especially one significant romantic relationship) and therefore hope to embody this approach. The past can be a cautionary tale, a reminder that we’ve endured pain, but we made it to the other side and learned from the experience.

 

Your Inner Voice: Friend or Foe?

by Linda Sapadin, Ph.D

Your Inner Voice: Friend or Foe?Who is the person you speak to most frequently?

Why, it’s yourself, of course.

And what is the nature of those conversations? Do you tend to be harsh, nasty and punitive about who you are and what you’ve done (or haven’t done?) Do you frequently expect too much of yourself? Are you your own worst enemy? Does your self-judgment pierce your heart, deflate your energy?

If so, it’s time to take two paths to change your inner voice from foe to friend.

 

How to Navigate Anger When You’re Used to Stuffing it Down

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

How to Navigate Anger When You’re Used to Stuffing it DownMany of us are afraid of our anger, so we shove it down. We may worry that if we express it, we’ll do damage to ourselves or others, said Selena C. Snow, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist who specializes in anger management in Rockville, Md.

We may say or do things at home or at work that we regret or will trigger negative consequences, she said.

Society also plays a role in shaping our fear or mistrust of anger.

 

What it Means to be Vulnerable

by Michael Hedrick

Flickr photo by gato-gato-gatoIt’s a fact of life that you can’t truly form a relationship with at least some degree of vulnerability. You have to open up at some point or another. This has been one of those particular problems for me and as I get older I’m slowly learning how to let people in.

The truth of it is that I tend to keep people at arm’s length. I tend to maintain a distance even between my closest friends and that may be to my detriment. Jumping in wholly and completely just isn’t something that’s easy for me to do. Whether it’s a result of being hurt in the past or a result of the paranoia I feel every day as someone living with schizophrenia I’m not sure.

 

Do You Want to Be Depressed?

by Therese J. Borchard

running“Do you WANT to get better?” a family member asked me a few weeks after I graduated from the psych ward in 2005.

I was furious and hurt.

Because it was just one of many insensitive comments that seem to imply that I was causing my illness.

 

3 Ways to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others On Social Media

by Emily Holland

teen_computer09“The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel.”
~ Steve Furtick

We all have certain triggers that can cause our confidence to take a sudden nosedive.

For some, it’s a trip to the gym. If you’re self-conscious of your body, watching fit people strut their stuff in their tightest fitting gym clothes likely has you over analyzing your every body part.

For others, it may be a certain individual — a family member, friend, or enemy that, for whatever reason, leaves them with the dreaded feeling that they just aren’t enough.

 

Siblings with Severe Mental Illness: Staying in Touch — And in the Loop

by Sarah Newman, MA

Siblings by Travis Swan

It’s difficult to know where you stand when your sibling is diagnosed with a severe mental illness. Their treatment can take up so much time and their symptoms can be so encompassing that there may not be a lot of room for you, let alone your relationship.

The dynamics of the family change after a diagnosis and you may feel like more of a caregiver than a brother or a sister.

 

Navigating the Holidays When You Have Depression

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Navigating the Holidays When You Have Depression For people with depression, the holidays can be a challenging time. People with the illness “tend to have a negative view of themselves and their lives,” said Selena C. Snow, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating depression in Rockville, Md.

“If they have overly idealized beliefs about what the holidays should look like, the resulting discrepancy can be very difficult.”

 

 
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