When Conflict Gets Dangerous

by Harriet Pappenheim, LCSW

When Conflict Gets DangerousAll couples fight. It’s perfectly healthy and normal. Disagreements are a natural part of relationships, and even if you’re deeply in love, some level of conflict is inevitable. In fact, avoiding conflict does more harm than good. Letting anger and resentment build up is a surefire recipe for trouble.

However, constant arguing can be a red flag that there’s something deeper going on — especially if the same sorts of issues keep rearing their heads. Don’t ignore them. You need to take action — and the sooner, the better.

 

Introducing Women’s Wellness Corner

by John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

Introducing Women's Wellness Corner

Sometimes women’s issues get a short shrift — both in psychology and society. How women cope with stress, treatment strategies, and life can be very different than how men cope. Yet all too often researchers and clinicians clump the two genders together. Women lose out.

That’s why I’m pleased to introduce Women’s Wellness Corner with Donna M. White. Women’s Wellness Corner is a blog dedicated to women and all who support women. This blog will explore a wide variety of physical, emotional, and mental issues while providing practical skills and information to cope.

 
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The Secret to Living with Treatment-Resistant Depression

by Therese J. Borchard

sad_woman09dYou’d never suspect this by listening to pharmaceutical ads, but only one-third of people with major depression get better after trying an antidepressant. The others go on to try different drugs, or combinations of medicine and psychotherapy, and usually seven in 10 achieve remission.

The other third?

They are labeled with the three most dreaded words in the mental health profession: treatment-resistant depression.

 

Best of Our Blogs: October 21, 2014

by Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A.
Best of Our Blogs

If you have ever forgotten to hit save on a document and lost hours spent on work you can’t recover, you understand the horror, shock and astonishment of accepting what feels unacceptable.

If you have ever lost precious, photos, your wallet or phone, you can relate to the anguish of not seeing something again.

If you have done something untraditional and nonconventional, you get what it feels like to be different.

If you understand that, you have a small glimpse into the world of someone who is struggling with illness, discrimination, or loss.

We often think we can’t understand what others are going through because we haven’t experienced it. But pain, hardship and loss are universal.

You can connect with others through empathy and compassion by reading our post on living with obsessive compulsive disorder. You can also do so by going inward, building up your own mental strength and cultivating compassion for your own struggles with criticism and self-doubt. The key isn’t to find the perfect thing to say, it’s about connecting, compassion and communicating as best as you can your love, understanding and support.

{Photo from here.}

{Photo from here.}

 

How Self-Compassion Builds a More Positive Body Image Than Self-Esteem

by Traci Pedersen

Body Image

“Beauty is perfect in its imperfections, so you just have to go with the imperfections.” — Diane Von Furstenberg

A new study by researchers at the University of Waterloo has touched on a somewhat taboo question: “What if women were to accept themselves with deep self-compassion — flaws and all?” In other words, what if we looked upon ourselves with kindness, compassion and forgiveness as we would a loved one or a dear friend? Would we gain a more positive body image?

The answer is yes.

 

The Benefits of Being Scared

by Dr. Carol Langlois

The Benefits of Being ScaredBeing scared isn’t always a negative. You can be scared in many different ways.

There is the “scary movie” kind of scared, where you don’t know what’s going to pop out on the screen. There’s the jumping out of a plane kind of scared, where you fear real death and your adrenaline is pumping loudly. Lastly, there is the taking a chance kind of scared, where you have to address someone or something that’s anxiety-producing and you don’t know if the outcome will be favorable.

 

Radical Self-Care for Moms

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Radical Self-Care for MomsAs a mom, when you hear that it’s important to take care of yourself, your eyes might glaze over and you may be thinking something like: “Another thing I need to add to my to-do list: ‘self-care.’ How am I supposed to do that?”

That’s the reaction Elizabeth Sullivan sometimes gets from her clients.

 

It Helps to Focus on the Positive Stuff

by Michael Hedrick

It Helps to Focus on the Positive StuffThings are OK as they are. That’s the one fact I’ve been struggling with recently.

I have this image in my mind as to how I want things to be. I want to make lots of money, I want a house in the mountains, I want to get married. All of this I worry about on a near-daily basis. These are also the things that drive me to work, to be better, and to achieve more things.

 

Why Real Love Is Hard Work

by Therese J. Borchard

rainbow loomA month into our relationship, my now-husband asked me, “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

I didn’t hesitate.

“As a nun in a third-world country doing missionary work,” I said.

“Interesting.”

Somewhere around that time I also told him it would be five years before I slept with him. It was the quickest five years of my life.

 

Stories that Sabotage Coping and Spike Stress

by Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Stories that Sabotage Coping and Spike StressOur belief systems, or personal stories, dictate our behavior. The stories we spin about ourselves can shape everything from the decisions we make to how we interact with others to the goals we accomplish.

“Our thoughts have tremendous power and largely create our realities,” said Joyce Marter, LCPC, a psychotherapist who writes the Psych Central blog The Psychology of Success.

 

What Drives a Person to Suicide?

by John Demartini

What Drives a Person to Suicide?Each of us has swings in our mood or has highs and lows in our emotional feelings. If these swings are within a certain normal range, we remain self-governed and functional. But when they become extreme, they can lead us into the poles of mania and depression. In some cases if the manias become extremely high, the depressions can become extremely low.

Similar, but other forms of these manias and depressions can be fantasies and nightmares or extreme degrees of pride and shame. When we are up, manic and elated, our brain can become flooded by increased releasing of dopamine, oxytocin, vasopressin, endorphins, enkephalins and serotonin. When we are depressed the reverse can occur and cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine, dihydrotestosterone, substance P and other neurotransmitters can surge.

 

Blue Collar Roots vs. White Collar Reality

by Elizabeth Grasher, MS, LPC, LMFT-A

Blue Collar Roots vs. White Collar RealityMy father was a machinist and my mother a nurse. I still recall the smell of the machine shop on my father’s clothing when he came home from work, the name “Gary” embroidered on his blue shirt. When I was a child, my father chopped wood and sold it by the side of the road to help make ends meet for his family of 5.

Due to my education I am considered “white collar” but still have “blue collar” values. I identify and belong to both groups.

 

 
Recent Comments
  • Nemya: Thank you so much for this article. It’s very concise and an easy read for those that have...
  • Fight Depression: thank you for the wonderful description.
  • acaw: Although you might be correct to identify a certain infantilism in some men these days, you go astray in...
  • mom of 4: Well, my experience with my son’s ODD agrees with pretty much everything on here. I am going to write...
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