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Veterans’ Service Dogs Most Commonly Ease Anxiety

How do service dogs help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? A new study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, found that the most important and most commonly performed task involved the dog disrupting the veteran’s anxiety episodes.

While previous studies have shown that service dogs can benefit some veterans with PTSD, it has remained unclear the exact role they play in their day-to-day lives.

“There has been some debate on what kind of training PTSD service dogs need to be effective and how their assistance may be different than what a pet dog can provide,” said Kerri Rodriguez, a human-animal interaction graduate student at Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and a lead author on the study.

“This study suggests that veterans are, in fact, using and benefiting from the specific trained tasks, which sets these dogs apart from pet dogs or emotional support dogs.”

Rodriguez led the work with Dr. Maggie O’Haire, associate professor of human-animal interaction.

The study was conducted in cooperation with K9s For Warriors, with support and funding from Merrick Pet Care, and is in preparation for an ongoing large-scale clinical trial that is studying veterans with and without service dogs over an extended period of time.

The researchers found that, on average, the dogs’ training to both alert the veteran to any increasing anxiety and to provide physical contact during anxiety episodes were the most important and most often used tasks in a typical day. Veterans with a service dog also rated all of the service dog’s trained tasks as being “moderately” to “quite a bit” important for their PTSD.

Some tasks include picking up on cues veterans exhibit when experiencing distress or anxiety and consequently nudging, pawing or licking them to encourage the veteran to focus on the dog. The service dogs also are trained to notice when veterans are experiencing anxiety at night and will actively wake up the person from nightmares.

The dogs also are trained to perform tasks in public, such as looking the opposite way in a crowded room or store to provide a sense of security for the veteran.

The findings also show that trained service dog tasks were used on average 3.16 times per day, with individual tasks ranging from an average of 1.36 to 5.05 times per day.

Earlier work led by Rodriguez shows that the bond between a service dog and the veteran is a significant factor in the importance of untrained behaviors. Although all trained tasks were reported to be important for veterans’ PTSD, those with a service dog actually rated the importance of untrained behaviors higher than the importance of trained tasks.

This suggests that there are some therapeutic aspects of the service dog’s companionship that are helping just as much, if not more, than the dog’s trained tasks, Rodriguez said.

“These service dogs offer valuable companionship, provide joy and happiness, and add structure and routine to veterans’ lives that are likely very important for veterans’ PTSD.”

The study surveyed 216 veterans from K9s For Warriors, including 134 with a service dog and 82 on the waitlist. The research complements a paper published last year that focused specifically on the service dogs’ training, behavior and the human-animal bond.

While service dogs were reported to help a number of specific PTSD symptoms such as having nightmares, experiencing flashbacks, or being hyper-aware in public, there were some symptoms that service dogs did not help, such as amnesia and risk-taking.

“Both this research, as well as other related studies on PTSD service dogs, suggest that service dogs are not a standalone cure for PTSD,” O’Haire said.

“Rather, there appear to be specific areas of veterans’ lives that a PTSD service dog can help as a complementary intervention to other evidence-based treatments for PTSD.”

Veterans on the waitlist to receive a service dog expected the service dog’s trained tasks to be more important for their PTSD and used more frequently on a daily basis than what was reported by veterans who already had a service dog.

“Veterans on the waitlist may have higher expectations for a future PTSD service dog because of feelings of hope and excitement, which may not necessarily be a bad thing,” Rodriguez said. “However, it is important for mental health professionals to encourage realistic expectations to veterans who are considering getting a PTSD service dog of their own.”

Source: Purdue University

Veterans’ Service Dogs Most Commonly Ease Anxiety

Traci Pedersen

Traci Pedersen is a professional writer with over a decade of experience. Her work consists of writing for both print and online publishers in a variety of genres including science chapter books, college and career articles, and elementary school curriculum.

APA Reference
Pedersen, T. (2020). Veterans’ Service Dogs Most Commonly Ease Anxiety. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 3, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2020/07/28/veterans-service-dogs-most-commonly-ease-anxiety/158443.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 27 Jul 2020 (Originally: 28 Jul 2020)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 27 Jul 2020
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.