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Kids Like Books That Explain Why and How Things Happen

A new study finds that children prefer storybooks that explain why and how things happen, a more nuanced and logical view of the world than may be expected. Investigators discovered children possess an insatiable appetite to understand why things are the way they are, leading to their apt description as “little scientists.”

While researchers have been aware of children’s interest in causal information, they didn’t know whether it influenced children’s preferences during real-world activities, such as reading.

The new study finds that children prefer storybooks containing more causal information. The results could help parents and teachers to choose the most engaging books to increase children’s interest in reading, which is important in improving early literacy and language skills.

Children have a burning urge to understand the mechanics of the world around them, and frequently bombard parents and teachers with questions about how and why things work the way they do (sometimes with embarrassing consequences).

Researchers have been aware of children’s appetite for causal information for some time. However, no one had previously linked this phenomenon to real-world activities such as reading or learning.

“There has been a lot of research on children’s interest in causality, but these studies almost always take place in a research lab using highly contrived procedures and activities,” said researcher and doctoral student Margaret Shavlik of Vanderbilt University, Tennessee.

“We wanted to explore how this early interest in causal information might affect everyday activities with young children, such as joint book reading.”

The study appears in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Researchers and parents understand that learning the factors that motivate children to read books is important. Encouraging young children to read more improves their early literacy and language skills and could get them off to a running start with their education.

Reading books in the company of a parent or teacher is a great way for children to start reading, and simply choosing the types of book that children most prefer could be an effective way to keep them interested and motivated.

In the study, Shavlik and her colleagues Drs. Amy Booth of Vanderbilt and Jessie Raye Bauer, then of the University of Texas at Austin, hypothesized that children prefer books with more causal information. They set out to investigate whether this was true by conducting a study involving 48 children aged 3-4 years from Austin. Their study involved an adult volunteer who read two different but carefully matched storybooks to the children, and then asked them about their preferences afterwards.

“We read children two books: one rich with causal information, in this case, about why animals behave and look the way they do, and another one that was minimally causal, instead just describing animals’ features and behaviors,” said Shavlik.

The children appeared to be equally as interested and enthusiastic while reading either type of book. However, when asked which book they preferred they tended to choose the book loaded with causal information, suggesting that the children were influenced by this key difference.

“We believe this result may be due to children’s natural desire to learn about how the world works,”  Shavlik said.

So, how could this help parents and teachers in their quest to get children reading? “If children do indeed prefer storybooks with causal explanations, adults might seek out more causally rich books to read with children. This, in turn may increase the child’s motivation to read together, making it easier to foster early literacy,” she said.

The study gives the first indicator that causality could be a key to engaging young minds during routine learning activities. Future studies could investigate if causally-rich content can enhance specific learning outcomes, including literacy, language skills and beyond. After all, learning should be about understanding the world around us, not just memorizing information.

Source: Frontiers/EurekAlert

Kids Like Books That Explain Why and How Things Happen

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2020). Kids Like Books That Explain Why and How Things Happen. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 9, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2020/04/16/kids-like-books-that-explain-why-and-how-things-happen/155778.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 16 Apr 2020 (Originally: 16 Apr 2020)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 16 Apr 2020
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.