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Some Mind-Body Therapies May Cut Opioid Use for Pain

In the first meta-analysis of scientific literature on the role of mind-body therapies in addressing opioid-treated pain, researchers have found that some of these treatments can reduce pain.

Moreover, investigators discovered the therapies are associated with reduced opioid use among patients treated with prescription opioids. The study appears in in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

“These findings are critical for medical and behavioral health professionals as they work with patients to determine the best and most effective treatments for pain,” said Dr. Eric Garland, lead author on the study, and the director of the University of Utah’s Center on Mindfulness and Integrative Health Intervention Development.

Garland said mind-body therapies focus on changing behavior and the function of the brain with the goal of improving quality of life and health. Mind-body therapies include clinical use of meditation/mindfulness, hypnosis, relaxation, guided imagery, therapeutic suggestion and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

The researchers examined over 4,200 articles to identify 60 previously published randomized controlled trials on psychologically oriented mind-body therapies for opioid-treated pain. The randomized controlled trials included in the study involved more than 6,400 study participants.

The research team looked at the type of pain experienced by the study participants (such as short-term pain from a medical procedure or long-term chronic pain), the type of mind-body therapy used, its effect on the severity of pain and the use (or misuse) of opioids.

They found that meditation/mindfulness, hypnosis, therapeutic suggestion and cognitive-behavioral therapy all demonstrated significant improvements in pain severity.

The investigators also found that the majority of the meditation/mindfulness, therapeutic suggestion and cognitive-behavioral therapy studies showed improvements in opioid use or misuse. In contrast, two studies utilizing relaxation found significantly worsened results in opioid dosing.

Notably, mind-body therapies seem to be effective at reducing acute pain from medical procedures, as well as chronic pain.

The researchers highlighted this as an important finding, as mind-body therapies could be easily integrated into standard medical practice and could potentially prevent chronic use of opioids and opioid use disorder.

Since mind-body therapies primarily use mental techniques and can continue to be utilized by patients after formal treatment, they may be more easily-accessible than other treatments. The researchers also concluded that two of the mind-body therapies examined, meditation/mindfulness and cognitive-behavioral therapy, might have the highest clinical impact, since they are so widely accessible and affordable.

“A study published earlier this year projected that by 2025, some 82,000 Americans will die each year from opioid overdose,” said Garland.

“Our research suggests that mind-body therapies might help alleviate this crisis by reducing the amount of opioids patients need to take to cope with pain. If all of us —doctors, nurses, social workers, policymakers, insurance companies and patients — use this evidence as we make decisions, we can help stem the tide of the opioid epidemic.”

Source: University of Utah

Some Mind-Body Therapies May Cut Opioid Use for Pain

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2019). Some Mind-Body Therapies May Cut Opioid Use for Pain. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 8, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/11/06/some-mind-body-therapies-may-cut-opioid-use-for-pain/151599.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 7 Nov 2019 (Originally: 6 Nov 2019)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 7 Nov 2019
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.