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Childhood Neglect and Abuse Have Long-Term Economic Consequences

Clearer Guidelines May Be Needed to Identify Child Neglect

More than half of social workers surveyed said a child should be at least 12 years old before being left home alone for four hours or longer, and four in five respondents said it should be illegal for children under 10 years to be left alone or four hours. The survey respondents were also more likely to consider a home-alone scenario as child neglect if the child was injured while left unsupervised.

“We found that social workers who participated in the study were significantly more likely to consider it child neglect when a child was left home alone if the child had suffered an injury, as compared to when they did not,” said Charles Jennissen, M.D., F.A.A.P., clinical professor and pediatric emergency medicine staff physician for the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City.

“The level of neglect is really the same whether a child knowingly left home alone is injured or not, and such situations should be handled the same by child protective investigators,” he said.

The authors say the results suggest the need for uniform guidelines and safety laws related to childhood supervision nationally, in order to direct social workers in their evaluation of potential cases of child neglect and to better protect children from harm.

For the study, researchers surveyed 485 members of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) who designated their practice as “Child/Family Welfare” from October to December 2015.

Participants were emailed a survey which featured various scenarios of children being left home alone for four hours. The scenarios also varied by whether the child had been injured or not when left at home alone, and if there were a relevant “home alone” laws.

In cases where a child was not injured, nearly every social worker determined that leaving a child home alone for four hours was child neglect when the child was 6 years old or younger.

More than 80% of social workers stated that this was child neglect if the child was 8 years or younger; about 50% said it was child neglect if the child was 10 or younger. A lower proportion described the scenario as child neglect when a child was age 12 or 14.

When the scenarios included the conditions where a law made it illegal to leave a child at home alone or a child was injured, social workers were significantly more likely to consider it a case of child neglect at 8, 10, 12 and 14 years of age.

The participants were also asked at what age should it be illegal to leave a child alone for four hours, over one-half stated it should be illegal for children under 12 years of age and four-fifths agreed it should be illegal for children under 10 years.

Research has shown that a lack of adult supervision contributes to more than 40% of U.S. pediatric injury-related deaths, the authors note.

“This study recognizes that there are critical connections between safety laws, advocates and professionals in child welfare, and families with small children,” said Gerene Denning, Ph.D., emeritus research scientist at Carver. “It takes partnership between all of these to prevent childhood injuries.”

The research abstract is being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition.

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics

Clearer Guidelines May Be Needed to Identify Child Neglect

Traci Pedersen

Traci Pedersen is a professional writer with over a decade of experience. Her work consists of writing for both print and online publishers in a variety of genres including science chapter books, college and career articles, and elementary school curriculum.

APA Reference
Pedersen, T. (2019). Clearer Guidelines May Be Needed to Identify Child Neglect. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 1, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/10/27/clearer-guidelines-may-be-needed-to-identify-child-neglect/151367.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 28 Oct 2019 (Originally: 27 Oct 2019)
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 28 Oct 2019
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.