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Best Ways for Dads to Bond With Their Kids

As dads prepare for an onslaught of ties, tools, wallets, and novelty socks as gifts for Father’s Day, a new study affirms that dads who spend their days off work with their children develop a stronger relationship with them.

But it is dads who pitch in on child care during the week who foster the best outcomes.

According to the University of Georgia’s Dr. Geoffrey Brown, play activities seem particularly important, even after taking into account the quality of fathers’ parenting.

“Fathers who make the choice to devote their time on non-workdays to engaging with their children directly seem to be developing the best relationships,” said Brown, an assistant professor in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “And on those non-workdays, pursuing activities that are child centered, or fun for the child, seems to be the best predictor of a good father-child relationship.”

Fathers who spend lots of time helping out with child care-related tasks on workdays who tend to develop the best relationships with their children, according to Brown.

On workdays, men who engage in high levels of play with their children actually have a slightly less secure attachment relationship with them, he added.

“It’s a complicated story, but I think this reflects differences in these contexts of family interaction time on workdays versus non-workdays,” Brown said. “The most important thing on a workday, from the perspective of building a good relationship with your children, seems to be helping to take care of them.”

In early childhood, the most common way to understand the parent-child relationship is the attachment relationship, according to Brown. Children form an emotional bond with their caregivers, and it serves a purpose by keeping them safe, providing comfort and security, and modeling how relationships should work.

For this study, Brown and his colleagues worked with 80 father-child pairs when the children were about 3 years old. The team conducted interviews and observed father-child interaction in the home, shooting video that was evaluated off site and assigned a score indicating attachment security.

“We’re trying to understand the connection between work life and family life and how fathers construct their role,” he said. “It’s clear that there are different contexts of family time. Relying too much on play during workdays, when your child/partner needs you to help out with caregiving, could be problematic. But play seems more important when there’s more time and less pressure.

“Ultimately, fathers who engage in a variety of parenting behaviors and adjust their parenting to suit the demands and circumstances of each individual day are probably most likely to develop secure relationships with their children,” he concluded.

The study was published in the Journal of Family Psychology.

Source: University of Georgia

Photo: ‘Fathers who make the choice to devote their time on non-workdays to engaging with their children directly seem to be developing the best relationships’ said Geoffrey Brown, assistant professor at the University of Georgia. ‘And on those non-workdays, pursuing activities that are child centered, or fun for the child, seems to be the best predictor of a good father-child relationship.’ Credit: UGA.

Best Ways for Dads to Bond With Their Kids

Janice Wood

Janice Wood is a long-time writer and editor who began working at a daily newspaper before graduating from college. She has worked at a variety of newspapers, magazines and websites, covering everything from aviation to finance to healthcare.

APA Reference
Wood, J. (2019). Best Ways for Dads to Bond With Their Kids. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 15, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/06/16/best-ways-for-dads-to-bond-with-their-kids/147829.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 15 Jun 2019
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 15 Jun 2019
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