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Study: OCD Research Needs to Focus on the Patients Themselves

Study: OCD Research Needs to Focus on the Patients Themselves

In a new paper published in the journal, Clinical Psychology Review, psychology researchers assert that scientific research into obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) has become further and further removed from the people these studies are supposed to help: OCD patients and the therapists who treat them.

On one hand, cognitive science has been extremely beneficial in furthering our understanding of mental health disorders. The interdisciplinary study of the mind and its processes embraces elements of psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, neuroscience and others topics. The field is rife with areas of exploration for researchers, and it has contributed enormously to the study of debilitating disorders such as OCD.

But for those living with OCD, research into their condition is not an abstract concept — it should have profound real-life implications.

Adam Radomsky, a professor in the department of psychology and the Concordia University Research Chair in Anxiety and Related Disorders, worries that for all its fascinating studies, cognitive science is becoming further and further removed from OCD patients and their therapists.

Radomsky and two of his former PhD students, Allison Ouimet and Andrea Ashbaugh, both now associate professors at the University of Ottawa, reviewed recent OCD research and found that, as interesting as it was, it did not necessarily translate into real benefits for treatment.

As Radomsky explains it, there are two hallmark symptoms of OCD.

“Obsessions are horrible intrusive thoughts people have over and over in their minds,” he explains. “Compulsions are things people do over and over again, like checking you’ve completed a task, or washing and cleaning.”

A commonly held belief among researchers suggests that memory has something to do with OCD behavior. “People are not sure if something is safe or clean or locked,” he says. An old theory was that the problem may have been cognitive in nature, or perhaps neurological.

Over the years, researchers have conducted countless studies on people with the disorder. However, after reviewing the literature, Radomsky says the overall results are equivocal.

“Research into memory, neurobiological and attention deficits probably have not helped therapists or clinicians and probably have not improved therapy,” he says.

The research did prove beneficial in another area though, that of the individual’s beliefs in their own cognitive functioning.

“It’s not that people with OCD have a memory deficit. It’s that they believe they have a memory deficit. It is not their ability to pay attention that is the problem; it is that they do not believe they can focus,” he says. “In the clinic, we can work with what people believe.”

As both an academic researcher and practicing psychologist, Radomsky says he hopes his review will be of help to colleagues inside and outside the lab.

“We think the review will help therapists focus on areas that will be of use, and hopefully help cognitive scientists look at domains that could be useful to clinicians,” he says.

Radomsky would like to see cognitive scientists and practitioners working closer together with the goal of providing better treatment for people living with OCD.

“We learn a lot from the science that researchers are doing, but we also learn a lot from clients and patients,” he says.

“In fact, in some ways, patients are the better instructors because they are living with these problems. I suspect we are going to increasingly follow their lead, because when they voice a particular concern or doubt in themselves, those are often the best ideas to take into the lab.”

Source: Concordia University

Study: OCD Research Needs to Focus on the Patients Themselves

Traci Pedersen

Traci Pedersen is a professional writer with over a decade of experience. Her work consists of writing for both print and online publishers in a variety of genres including science chapter books, college and career articles, and elementary school curriculum.

APA Reference
Pedersen, T. (2019). Study: OCD Research Needs to Focus on the Patients Themselves. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 26, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/06/07/study-ocd-research-needs-to-focus-on-the-patients-themselves/146049.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 7 Jun 2019
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 7 Jun 2019
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.