advertisement
Home » News » Visiting Urban Park Can Foster Happiness, Workout or Not
Gain Happiness from Hanging Out in an Urban Park

Visiting Urban Park Can Foster Happiness, Workout or Not

New research suggests spending 20 minutes in an urban park can improve happiness, regardless of whether a person is engaging in exercise or not during the visit.

Investigators from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Occupational Therapy led the study which appears in the International Journal of Environmental Health Research. They found that contact with the natural environment and engagement in health-promoting and/or social and recreational activities in parks improved happiness.

Principal investigator Hon K. Yuen, Ph.D., OTR/L, discovered park users experience physical and mental health benefits such as stress reduction and recovery from mental fatigue. Yuen said the original intent of the project was to validate previous research findings on the impact of park visit on emotional well-being.

He also wanted to evaluate the contribution of choosing to participate in physical activity in the park in relation to emotional well-being after the park visit.

“Overall, we found park visitors reported an improvement in emotional well-being after the park visit,” said Yuen. “However, we did not find levels of physical activity are related to improved emotional well-being. Instead, we found time spent in the park is related to improved emotional well-being.”

Co-author Gavin R. Jenkins, Ph.D., OTR/L, said this means potentially all people can benefit from time in a park. If you cannot be physically active due to aging, a disability or any other limitations, the study implies a person can still gain health benefits just from a visit to a local park.

Participants of the study were adult visitors to Overton, Jemison or Cahaba River Walk Parks in Mountain Brook, Alabama. Data were collected from 98 adult park visitors; four visitors reported that they participated in this study twice.

Data from the second participation were excluded, resulting in 94 unique participants participating in the study. These parks were selected for the study because they were the three main public parks in Mountain Brook and had a relatively high volume of visitors daily.

Yuen said several limitations of the study included the lack of objective data to measure emotional health and confining the study to just three urban parks in a six-month data collection period.

Although a small study, Jenkins said the significance of these findings helps reinforce the need for more urban parks and the conservation of those that already exist.

“There is increasing pressure on green space within urban settings,” said Jenkins.

“Planners and developers look to replace green space with residential and commercial property. The challenge facing cities is that there is an increasing evidence about the value of city parks but we continue to see the demise of these spaces.”

Source: University of Alabama Birmingham

Visiting Urban Park Can Foster Happiness, Workout or Not

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2019). Visiting Urban Park Can Foster Happiness, Workout or Not. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 18, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/03/18/visiting-urban-park-can-foster-happiness-workout-or-not/143253.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 18 Mar 2019
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 18 Mar 2019
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.