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New Approach May Improve Prediction of Young Adult Suicide Risk

New Approach May Improve Prediction of Young Adult Suicide Risk

Although suicide is the second leading cause of death in the U.S. among those aged 15 to 34 years, the ability to predict suicidal behavior is still only slightly better than chance. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine believe a new method may better detect those at high risk by tracking the fluctuation and severity of depressive symptoms.

The researchers believe the new strategy is much better at predicting risk of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults than using psychiatric diagnoses alone.

Their findings, which include the description of a new Prediction Risk Score, appear in JAMA Psychiatry. Researchers believe the new tool will help clinicians better identify patients at risk for suicidal behavior and facilitate earlier intervention than the current standard.

“Predicting suicidal behavior is one of the most challenging tasks in psychiatry, but for an outcome that is so life-threatening, it is definitely not acceptable that we’re only doing slightly better than chance,” said senior author Nadine Melhem, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry at Pitt’s School of Medicine.

Physicians rely heavily on psychiatric diagnoses when estimating suicide risk, but though they are quite useful, diagnoses alone don’t do a great job because they are labels that often don’t change.

Instead, Melhem wanted to develop a predictive model that would identify symptoms that can change over time because such a model, she surmised, would be more accurate at signaling the likelihood of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults.

In the study, Melhem along with Pitt colleague David Brent, M.D., and John Mann, M.D., professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, followed 663 young adults who were at high risk for suicidal behavior because their parents had been diagnosed with mood disorders.

Over 12 years, the parents and their children were periodically evaluated through standard assessments for psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms of depression, hopelessness, irritability, impulsivity, aggression and impulsive aggression.

After analyzing data for all these symptoms, the researchers found that having severe depressive symptoms and a high variability of those symptoms over time was the most accurate predictor of suicidal behavior. The severity and variability in impulsivity and aggression over time did not add to the prediction model.

The research team combined this measure of variability in depressive symptoms along with other relevant factors such as younger age, mood disorders, childhood abuse, and personal and parental history of suicide attempts to develop a Prediction Risk Score.

They concluded that a score of 3 or more of these risk factors indicated a higher risk for suicidal behavior. Using this threshold in the study population, they found the predictive test to be 87 percent sensitive, much better than currently available models.

The model has to be independently tested and replicated in different populations, and future research to include objective biological markers will be needed to make the Prediction Risk Score more accurate, said Melhem.

“Our findings suggest that when treating patients, clinicians must pay particular attention to the severity of current and past depressive symptoms and try to reduce their severity and fluctuations to decrease suicide risk,” she said.

“The Prediction Risk Score is a valuable addition to the physician’s toolkit to help predict suicide risk in high-risk individuals, and it can be done at little cost because the information needed is already being collected as part of standard evaluations.”

Source: University of Pittsburg/EurekAlert

New Approach May Improve Prediction of Young Adult Suicide Risk

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2019). New Approach May Improve Prediction of Young Adult Suicide Risk. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 19, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/02/28/new-approach-may-improve-prediction-of-young-adult-suicide-risk/143305.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 28 Feb 2019
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 28 Feb 2019
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