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Extra Support for Suicidal Teens Reduces Risk During Young Adulthood

Extra Support for Suicidal Teens Can Cut Risk of Dying Young

Providing a suicidal teen with extra support from a few caring adults during vulnerable times appears to reduce the risk of dying young. And researchers discovered youth-support teams appear to make a long-term difference.

In the study, researchers from the University of Michigan tracked deaths among hundreds of young adults who were hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or attempts during their teen years. The youth were enrolled in the study during the early 2000s.

Half of the young people had been randomly assigned to receive the extra support of a few caring adults who received training in how to help the teens stick to their treatment plan and how to talk with them in ways that could encourage positive behavioral choices. The other half received the usual levels of care for the time.

In the study, which appears in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, investigators discovered that far more of the young people who got standard care had died, compared with young adults in the group who had received the extra adult support. This outcome was observed after about 12 years.

The “Youth-Nominated Support Teams,” or YSTs as the original study called them, were made up of family members, coaches, teachers, youth group leaders and other adults.

For three months following each teen’s hospitalization for suicidal behavior, these 656 “caring adults” received weekly telephone support from professional staff to address their questions and concerns and help them feel more comfortable in their role with the teens.

Although the study of hundreds of young adults cannot show cause and effect, it shows a strong association between the YST approach and a reduced overall risk of early death. The research found the approach specifically reduced risk of death from either suicide or drug overdose of undetermined intent.

The new study was coordinated by a team led by Cheryl King, Ph.D., a U-M professor of psychiatry and psychology, and leader of the original YST study. The researchers matched the original information about the study participants with national death records and state death certificates.

In all, 15 of the 448 study participants had died by 2016, but only two of the deaths were among those who had been assigned to the YST group. Statistically, this meant that the non-YST group had a six-fold higher rate of death.

The deaths, which occurred when the study participants were age 18 through 26, were ruled suicides in four instances, drug overdoses or an infection likely related to drug use in nine cases, and one case each of homicide and motor vehicle crash.

When the researchers looked at only the unknown intent drug deaths and suicides, there were eight in the usual-treatment group, but only one in the YST group.

However, the number of suicides was too small to show a statistical difference in the number of suicides between the three in the non-YST group and the one in the YST group.

“The YST intervention may have had small and cascading positive effects that combined to have a long-term impact on the risk of dying,” said King.

When King and her colleagues carried out the original study, they looked mainly at whether the teens stuck to their mental health treatment plans, got help for drug or alcohol problems if they had them, and expressed suicidal thoughts in the first year.

The teens in the YST group were more likely to go to their therapy and medication-related appointments, and to attend substance use-related sessions during the year following their hospitalization for suicide risk.

In the first weeks after their hospitalization, the YST group had lower rates of suicidal thoughts. But when the one-year follow-up ended, the researchers found no major effect on suicidal ideation or self-harm.

The precise cause of the difference in deaths between the two groups, more than a decade later, is unknown. But King ventures that the extra support of adults — including parents, one of whom teens named to their support teams three-quarters of the time — may have helped.

“We know from other research that we need to look at all causes of early mortality that are preventable” because of the often intertwined nature of drug use and abuse, depression and other mental health disorders, and suicidal behavior, King said.

The intertwined nature of these disorders can even continue in death, when death certificates are vague about the cause of death and whether an overdose was intentional or unintentional.

The next step for King and her co-authors is additionally examine YST and its long-term results.

Source: University of Michigan/EurekAlert

Extra Support for Suicidal Teens Can Cut Risk of Dying Young

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2019). Extra Support for Suicidal Teens Can Cut Risk of Dying Young. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 14, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/02/11/extra-support-for-suicidal-teens-can-cut-risk-of-dying-young/142701.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Feb 2019
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 11 Feb 2019
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