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Therapeutic Video Game Helps Kids with ADHD and ASD

Therapeutic Video Game May Help Kids with ADHD and Autism

A new pilot study finds promise in a digital medicine tool designed as a  treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and co-occurring attention/deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

The study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) confirmed the acceptability, feasibility, and safety of Project: EVO, which delivers sensory and motor stimuli through an action video game experience.

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) evaluated the use of interventions provided via an action video game experience, or an educational activity involving pattern recognition. Investigators found the intervention was well-received by children and helped to improve their attention span.

Both parents and children reported that the treatment had value for improving a child’s ability to pay attention and served as a worthwhile approach for treatment. The results of the study appear in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

Researchers say the findings confirm the acceptability, feasibility, and safety of Project: EVO, which delivers sensory and motor stimuli through an action video game experience.

As many as 50 percent of children with ASD have some ADHD symptoms, with roughly 30 percent receiving a secondary diagnosis of ADHD. However, since ADHD medications are less effective in children with both disorders than in those with only ADHD, researchers are exploring alternative treatments.

Children with ASD and ADHD symptoms are also at high risk for impaired cognitive function, including the ability to maintain attention and focus on goals while ignoring distractions. As children reach school age and beyond, these cognitive impairments make it more difficult for them to set and achieve goals, as well as successfully navigate the demands of day-to-day life in the community.

“Our study showed that children engaged with the Project: EVO treatment for the recommended amount of time, and that parents and children reported high rates of satisfaction with the treatment,” said Benjamin Yerys, Ph.D., a child psychologist at CHOP’s Center for Autism Research (CAR) and first and corresponding author on the study.

“Based on the promising study results, we look forward to continuing to evaluate the potential for Project: EVO as a new treatment option for children with ASD and ADHD.”

The feasibility study was conducted by a team of researchers at CAR in collaboration with Akili. The study included 19 children aged 9-13 diagnosed with ASD and co-occurring ADHD symptoms. Participants in the study were given either the Project: EVO treatment, which is delivered via an action video game experience, or an educational activity involving pattern recognition.

The primary outcome measure for efficacy was the TOVA API, an FDA-cleared objective measure of attention. Key secondary outcome measures were caregiver reports of ADHD symptoms and the ability of the child to plan and complete tasks, as well as a cognitive test battery assessing working memory.

The study found that after using Project: EVO, children showed a trend toward improved attention on the TOVA API score, and they showed general ADHD symptom improvement based on parent reports.

Though the sample size of the study was small, the study showed that using Project: EVO was feasible and acceptable with potentially therapeutic effects.

The research is published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. The team is now planning a larger follow-up study for continued evaluation of Project: EVO’s potential efficacy.

Source: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/EurekAlert

Therapeutic Video Game May Help Kids with ADHD and Autism

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2019). Therapeutic Video Game May Help Kids with ADHD and Autism. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 18, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/01/28/therapeutic-video-game-may-help-kids-with-adhd-and-autism/141681.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 28 Jan 2019
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 28 Jan 2019
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