advertisement
Home » Childhood ADHD » Younger Sibs of Kids with Autism or ADHD May Be At Higher Risk
Younger Sibs of Kids with Autism or ADHD May Be At Higher Risk

Younger Sibs of Kids with Autism or ADHD May Be At Higher Risk

Emerging research suggests later-born siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are at elevated risk for both disorders. The University of California, Davis, study suggests that families who already have a child diagnosed with ASD or ADHD may wish to monitor younger siblings for symptoms of both conditions.

The study, led by Dr. Meghan Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and at the UC Davis MIND Institute, appears in JAMA Pediatrics.

Symptoms of ADHD include difficulty focusing, nonstop talking or blurting things out, increased activity, and trouble sitting still.

Symptoms of ASD include significant challenges with social interaction and communication, as well as the presence of unusual interests or repetitive behaviors like hand flapping or lining up objects.

“We’ve known for a long time that younger siblings of children with autism are at higher-than-average risk for autism, but the field didn’t have adequate data to tell whether they were at increased risk for ADHD,” said Miller.

“Despite the fact that autism and ADHD appear very different in their descriptions, this work highlights the overlapping risk; younger siblings of children with ASD are at elevated risk of both ADHD and autism, and younger siblings of children with ADHD are at elevated risk not only for ADHD, but also for autism.”

Miller’s research team looked at medical records of 730 later-born siblings of children with ADHD, 158 later-born siblings of children with ASD, and 14,287 later-born siblings of children with no known diagnosis. Only families who had at least one younger child after a diagnosed child were included in the study.

“Evaluating recurrence risk in samples that include only families who have had an additional child after a diagnosed child is important because recurrence may be underestimated if researchers include families who decided to stop having children after a child was diagnosed with ASD or ADHD,” explained Miller.

In the study, investigators discovered the odds of an ASD diagnosis were 30 times higher in later-born siblings of children with ASD. It was 3.7 times higher for a diagnosis of ADHD, as compared to later-born siblings of children not diagnosed with ASD.

Among later born siblings of children with ADHD, the odds an ADHD diagnosis were 13 times higher in later-born siblings of children. The odds of an ASD diagnosis were 4.4 times higher, as compared to later-born siblings not diagnosed with ADHD.

ADHD and ASD are believed to share some genetic risk factors and biological influences. This study supports the conclusion that ASD and ADHD are highly heritable and may share underlying causes and genetics.

Researchers believe the development of reliable recurrence risk estimates of diagnoses within the same disorder and across other disorders can aid screening and early-detection efforts. Moreover, the linkage can enhance understanding of potential shared causes of the disorders. The ability to diagnose ASD and ADHD early could improve both treatment and quality of life.

“There are reliable screening measures and practices for the diagnosis of autism in very young children,” Miller said.

“Unfortunately, we don’t have any clinical standards or adequate tools for screening for ADHD at such young ages. We are currently working on identifying early markers of autism and ADHD in infants and toddlers who have an older diagnosed sibling, since these younger siblings are at elevated risk for ASD and ADHD.”

Source: UC, Davis

Younger Sibs of Kids with Autism or ADHD May Be At Higher Risk

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Younger Sibs of Kids with Autism or ADHD May Be At Higher Risk. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 17, 2019, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/12/11/younger-sibs-of-kids-with-autism-or-adhd-may-be-at-higher-risk/141100.html
Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Dec 2018
Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 11 Dec 2018
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.