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Resiliency Key Skill to Help Men Move On After Death of Spouse

Resilience May Be Key to Moving On After Wife’s Death

A new study finds that men who lack resilience are especially vulnerable to becoming severely depressed after their spouse dies.

But resilience did not significantly impact whether a women would develop depression, a finding that Florida State University researchers believe may be explained by women having stronger social networks.

Their findings appear in The Gerontologist.

In the research, Brittany King, a graduate student in the Department of Sociology, along with Assistant Professor Dawn Carr and Associate Professor Miles Taylor, examined the symptoms of depression in older men and women before and after they experienced the loss of their spouse.

“People are living longer,” King said. “Successful aging is important, and these findings add to the knowledge base that will help us have a more robust and healthy older adult population.”

The research team used data from the Health and Retirement Study which surveyed married people, ages 51 and older, between 2006 and 2012. They examined the changes in depressive symptoms among men and women who lost their spouse and those who remained married.

Their survey sample included 2,877 women, 335 of whom became widowed, and 2,749 men, 136 of whom became widowed, within a four-year time span.

Researchers used survey responses to give each participant a Simplified Resilience Score based on 12 questions, such as “if something can go wrong for me it will,” or “I have a sense of direction and purpose in my life.”

Investigators discovered that if a man became widowed and had a high resilience score, they experienced no increase in depressive symptoms. Despite the loss of a spouse, their level of well-being almost mirrored that of their married counterparts.

However, men with a low resilience score fared much worse. Males who became widowed and had low levels of resilience experienced an increase of about three additional depressive symptoms; their married counterparts only experienced about one additional depressive symptom over a four-year period.

For women it was different.

They found women who had a low resilience score of four or below experienced a slight increase in depressive symptoms whether they became widowed or stayed married. Widowed women with high resilience scores also experienced a slight increase in depressive symptoms.

“For widowed women, high levels of resilience did little to reduce increases in depression following spousal loss,” Carr said.

“In contrast, men with these high levels of internal resources overcome all of that, they recover really well within a four-year period and move on. Yet having low resilience appears to be particularly bad for men who on average experienced three additional depressive symptoms out of eight.”

Women who were continuously married with high levels of resilience experienced a small decrease in depressive symptoms within four years.

Researchers speculate external resources, such as social networks, could be one explanation for the gender divide.

Women tend to have more external resources in terms of social support such as friends and family. On the other hand, older men may be more vulnerable after losing their main social contact and source of care.

The researchers believe additional studies should examine gender differences following the loss of a spouse, and specifically examining internal resources that may aid in the absence of social resources.

Source: Florida State University

Resilience May Be Key to Moving On After Wife’s Death

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Resilience May Be Key to Moving On After Wife’s Death. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 12, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/11/26/resilience-may-be-key-to-moving-on-after-wifes-death/139784.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 26 Nov 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 26 Nov 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.