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Despite Warnings, Sedative Drugs Still Prescribed to Older Adults

Despite Warnings, Benzos Still Prescribed to Older Adults

Emerging research finds that despite years of warnings that older adults shouldn’t take benzodiazepine medications that put them at risk of injury and death, many primary care doctors are still prescribing them.

A new study by University of Michigan mapped the prescription pattern of benzodiazepines in the United States, county by country. Investigators discovered a wide variation as some regions, especially the Deep South and rural western states, had three times the level of sedative prescribing as others.

Investigators also discovered variance at the level of individual prescribers: Some primary care providers prescribed sedatives more than six times more often than their peers. These high-intensity prescribers of drugs such as Xanax, Ativan and Valium also tended to be high-intensity prescribers of opioid painkillers.

The counties with the most intense sedative prescribing also tended to have lower incomes, less-educated populations, and higher suicide rates, the study finds. They also overlap with other maps showing high county-level opioid painkiller prescribing.

“Taken all together, our findings suggest that primary care providers may be prescribing benzodiazepines to medicate distress,” says Donovan Maust, M.D., M.Sc., the geriatric psychiatrist from the University of Michigan who led the study.

“And since these drugs increase major health risks, especially when taken with opioid painkillers, it’s quite possible that benzodiazepine prescribing may contribute to the shortened life expectancies that others have observed in residents of these areas.”

The study appears in the Journal of General Internal Medicine and was led by a team from U-M Department of Psychiatry and the University of Pennsylvania. Meaningfully, the study shows the power of data to highlight persistent inappropriate use of medications.

Researchers used data on prescriptions written in 2015 by primary care providers for patients in the Medicare Part D drug program. The researchers combined it with county-level health and socioeconomic data from the County Health Rankings project.

In the single year studied, the 122,054 primary care providers included in the study prescribed 728 million days’ worth of benzodiazepines to their patients, at a cost of $200 million.

The states with the highest intensity of prescribing — which the researchers defined as the proportion of all medication days prescribed that were of benzodiazepines — were Alabama, Tennessee, West Virginia, Florida and Louisiana, while Minnesota, Alaska, New York, Hawaii and South Dakota had the lowest.

Across all types of providers, primary care and otherwise, benzodiazepines accounted for 2.3 percent of all medication days prescribed to Part D participants by those providers that year.

Primary care doctors accounted for 62 percent of the total. In fact, the researchers focused on primary care providers specifically because previous studies had showed they account for the majority of benzodiazepines prescribed to older adults, who are much less likely than younger adults to see a psychiatrist.

Higher sedative prescription intensity was also associated at the county level with more days of poor mental health, a higher proportion of disability-eligible Medicare beneficiaries, and a higher suicide rate.

Benzodiazepines have often been prescribed to ease anxiety or insomnia, though several studies have shown that patients receiving the drugs often don’t have a formal diagnosis of either condition.

Although the medications do help with anxiety and insomnia, unintended consequences such as clouded thinking ability, higher risk of auto accidents, falls and fractures, and a tendency develop a long-term use pattern are common.

Benzodiazepines as a class are the second-most common group of drugs associated with medication-related overdose deaths, right behind opioid painkillers.

Such risks have landed benzodiazepines on the national guideline for prescription drugs that people over age 65 shouldn’t take, though their short-term use in treating anxiety or insomnia that haven’t responded to other options is still considered acceptable.

To contribute to the county-level study, a given primary care provider had to prescribe a benzodiazepine at least 10 times in 2015. For the individual physician-level study, 109,700 doctors were studied, since the 10 percent of prescribers who saw the fewest Medicare beneficiaries were excluded.

The researchers divided individual prescribers into four groups according to the intensity level of their benzodiazepine prescribing.

The range was large — for the lowest group, about 0.6 percent of their total prescriptions were for benzodiazepines, compared with 3.9 percent of the highest-intensity group. That’s a 6.5-fold difference in benzodiazepine prescribing.

Those in the highest-intensity group were also likely to be high-intensity prescribers for opioids and antibiotics, and also for other drugs that have been classed as high-risk for older adults.

“That the same providers appear to be high-intensity prescribers of both medications is potential cause for concern,” says Maust.

Female primary care providers were less likely to be high-intensity benzodiazepine prescribers. The more years a physician had been in practice, the higher their chance of being a high-intensity prescriber.

Physicians with higher percentages of patients who were white, or who received the “Extra Help” payments available to low-income, low-resource patients under Part D of Medicare, were also more likely to be high-intensity sedative prescribers.

Source: University of Michigan

Despite Warnings, Benzos Still Prescribed to Older Adults

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Despite Warnings, Benzos Still Prescribed to Older Adults. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/11/12/despite-warnings-benzos-still-prescribed-to-older-adults/139617.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 12 Nov 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 12 Nov 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.