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Study Finds You Can Handle The Truth, After All

Study Finds You Can Handle The Truth, After All

New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business explores the consequences of honesty in everyday life and finds that people can often afford to be more honest than they think.

In the paper, Dr. Emma Levine of the Booth school and Carnegie Mellon University’s Dr. Taya Cohen discovered people significantly overestimate the costs of honest conversations.

“We’re often reluctant to have completely honest conversations with others,” said Levine. “We think offering critical feedback or opening up about our secrets will be uncomfortable for both us and the people with whom we are talking.”

The researchers conclude that such fears are often misguided.

Honest conversations are far more enjoyable for communicators than they expect them to be, and the listeners of honest conversations react less negatively than expected.

The research findings appear in the Journal of Experiment Psychology: General.

For purposes of the study, the researchers define honesty as “speaking in accordance with one’s own beliefs, thoughts and feelings.”

Then, in a series of experiments, the researchers explore the actual and predicted consequences of honesty in everyday life.

In one field experiment, participants were instructed to be completely honest with everyone in their lives for three days. In a laboratory experiment, participants had to be honest with a close relational partner while answering personal and potentially difficult discussion questions.

A third experiment instructed participants to honestly share negative feedback to a close relational partner. Across all the experiments, individuals expect honesty to be less pleasant and less social connecting than it actually is.

“Taken together, these findings suggest that individuals’ avoidance of honesty may be a mistake,” the researchers write.

“By avoiding honesty, individuals miss out on opportunities that they appreciate in the long run, and that they would want to repeat.”

Source: University of Chicago-Booth

Study Finds You Can Handle The Truth, After All

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Study Finds You Can Handle The Truth, After All. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/09/20/study-finds-you-can-handle-the-truth-after-all/138854.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 20 Sep 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 20 Sep 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.