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Mid-Life Women May See Less Stress

Mid-Life Women May See Less Stress

Evidence has been mixed about whether midlife is a dissatisfying time for women, or a time when women are less stressed and enjoy a higher quality of life.

A new University of Michigan study found that perceived stress — a measure of confidence, control and ability to cope with life’s stressors — did indeed decrease for most women over a 15-year span.

Epidemiologist Dr. Elizabeth Hedgeman, a graduate of the U-M School of Public Health, and colleagues also found that menopausal status wasn’t a factor, which challenges the notion that menopause is associated with higher stress and depression.

The results come from data collected from more than 3,000 women who were recruited between the ages of 42-53 for the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation.

Researchers measured the effects of age, menopausal status and sociodemographics on stress over time. Hedgeman did the work while in the lab of Dr. Sioban Harlow, professor of epidemiology at the U-M School of Public Health.

By the end of the study period, the mean age was 62 and stress declined with age across nearly all sociodemographic categories.

Most racial/ethnic groups — similar black, white and Chinese women — experienced similar declines of stress with age. Japanese women, however, presented less stress relief, a finding that remained consistent after adjusting for other sociodemographic variables.

Women with less education and increased financial hardship consistently reported higher levels of stress compared to their peers, but this difference diminished over time.

“The results suggested that even women with less education or more financial hardship reported less perceived stress over the midlife,” Hedgeman said.

“And then there’s menopause. Our perception of stress decreased even through the menopausal transition, which suggests that menopause isn’t a great bugaboo, perhaps in relation to the other events or experiences that we’re having in the midlife.”

Education, employment and financial hardship were stronger predictors of perceived stress over midlife than the menopause transition. This may suggest that women experience the menopausal transition as a series of acute stressors (hot flashes, sleep disturbances) that can be muted by chronic, socioeconomic-based life stressors.

The only groups that reported increased perceived stress over the study were Hispanic and white women from New Jersey, but Hedgeman said these are outlier results that needed to be replicated. Additionally, there were extenuating circumstances at the New Jersey site that may have contributed.

Despite reporting decreased levels of stress throughout life, women who reported higher stress at the start of midlife continued to report higher stress levels than their peers as they aged. This is important because stress is a known health risk.

The study did not specifically examine the reasons for this decrease in perceived stress, but Hedgeman said that there could be both circumstantial and neurological causes.

For instance, children may have moved out, professional goals are being met, or women may be in a good position before the next life challenges arise, such as chronic health conditions or aging parents.

Existing research also suggests that aging helps us regulate our emotions.

“Perhaps things just don’t bother us as much as we age, whether due to emotional experience or neurochemical changes. It’s all worth exploring,” Hedgeman said. Overall, the findings are good news for women transitioning through midlife, she said.

“The neat thing is that for most of us, our perception of stress decreases as we age through the midlife,” she said. “Perhaps life itself is becoming less stressful, or maybe we’re finally feeling at the top of our game, or maybe things just don’t bother us the way they did.

“But whatever the root reason, we’re reporting less perceived stress as we age through the midlife and menopause.”

The primary limitation of the study was the inability to understand perceived stress among women reporting the highest levels over time. Also, a disruption of operations at the New Jersey site limited the number of visits to five, not 13 as with the other sites. Also, New Jersey was the only site that recruited Hispanic women.

Source: University of Michigan/EurekAlert

Mid-Life Women May See Less Stress

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Mid-Life Women May See Less Stress. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/04/25/mid-life-women-may-see-less-stress/134899.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 25 Apr 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 25 Apr 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.