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How to Counter Rudeness at Work For A Good Night's Sleep

How to Counter Rudeness at Work For A Good Night’s Sleep

If you’ve had a bad day at work thanks to rude colleagues, doing something fun and relaxing afterwards could promote a better night’s sleep.

The new findings appear in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association.

“Sleep quality is crucial because sleep plays a major role in how employees perform and behave at work,” said lead author Caitlin Demsky, Ph.D., of Oakland University in Michigan.

“In our fast-paced, competitive professional world, it is more important than ever that workers are in the best condition to succeed, and getting a good night’s sleep is key to that.”

Demsky and her co-authors surveyed 699 employees of the U.S. Forest Service. Participants were asked to rate the level of rude behavior they experienced in the workplace.

They were also queried on how often they had negative thoughts about work, whether they have insomnia symptoms and how much they were able to detach from work and relax.

Additional information requested included the number of children under 18 living at home, hours worked per week, and frequency of alcoholic drinks, as these have previously been linked with sleep issues.

Experiencing rude or negative behavior at work, such as being judged or verbally abused, was linked with more symptoms of insomnia, including waking up multiple times during the night. But people who were able to detach and do something relaxing to recover after work — such as yoga, listening to music or going for a walk — lept better.

“Incivility in the workplace takes a toll on sleep quality,” said Demsky. “It does so in part by making people repeatedly think about their negative work experiences. Those who can take mental breaks from this fare better and do not lose as much sleep as those who are less capable of letting go.”

Repeated negative thoughts about work may also be linked to several health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, increased blood pressure and fatigue, according to the authors.

Demsky suggests that managers can be role models for employees after work by not sending work-related messages outside of business hours, for example.

The authors also suggested that employers encourage programs aimed at reducing workplace incivility — programs such as “Civility, Respect, Engagement in the Workforce,” launched by the Veterans Health Administration to promote positive and respectful communication among co-workers.

Source: American Psychological Association

How to Counter Rudeness at Work For A Good Night’s Sleep

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). How to Counter Rudeness at Work For A Good Night’s Sleep. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/04/24/how-to-counter-rudeness-at-work-for-a-good-nights-sleep/134862.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 24 Apr 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 24 Apr 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.