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Sudden Financial Loss Can Be Life-Threatening

Sudden Financial Loss Can Be Life-Threatening

Researchers have discovered that a sudden loss of net worth in middle or older age is associated with a significantly higher risk of death. Investigators from Northwestern Medicine and University of Michigan discovered that when people lose 75 percent or more of their total wealth during a two-year period, they are 50 percent more likely to die in the next 20 years.

“We found losing your life savings has a profound effect on a person’s long-term health,” said lead author Dr. Lindsay Pool, a research assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

“It’s a very pervasive issue. It wasn’t just a few individuals but more than 25 percent of Americans who had a wealth shock over the 20 years of the study.”

Although the rate of savings loss spiked during the Great Recession, significant losses occurred for many middle- and older-age Americans across the 20-year study period beginning in 1992 regardless of the larger economic climate.

The study, published in JAMA, is the first to look at the long-term effects of a large financial loss.

“Our findings offer new evidence for a potentially important social determinant of health that so far has not been recognized: sudden loss of wealth in late middle or older age,” said senior author Dr. Carlos Mendes de Leon, professor of epidemiology and global public health at University of Michigan’s School of Public Health.

The study also examined a group of low-income people who didn’t have any wealth accumulated and who are considered socially vulnerable in terms of their health. Their increased risk of mortality over 20 years was 67 percent.

“The most surprising finding was that having wealth and losing it is almost as bad for your life expectancy as never having wealth,” Pool said.

The likely cause of the increased death risk may be twofold. “These people suffer a mental health toll because of the financial loss as well as pulling back from medical care because they can’t afford it,” Pool said.

The new study builds on prior research in the wake of the Great Recession from 2007 to the early 2010s. Those studies examined short-term health effects such as depression, blood pressure and other markers of stress that changed as peoples’ financial circumstances took a nosedive.

The study was based on data from the Health and Retirement Study from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Started in 1992, the longitudinal study follows a representative group of U.S. adults 50 years and older every two years. More than 8,000 participants were included in the Northwestern study.

“This shows clinicians need to have an awareness of their patients’ financial circumstances,” Pool said. “It’s something they need to ask about to understand if their patients may be at an increased health risk.”

Next, Pool and colleagues will investigate the mechanisms that lead to higher mortality after a big financial loss. “Why are people dying, and can we intervene at some point in a way that might reverse the course of that increased risk?” she said.

Source: Northwestern University/EurekAlert

Sudden Financial Loss Can Be Life-Threatening

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Sudden Financial Loss Can Be Life-Threatening. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/04/04/sudden-financial-loss-can-be-life-threatening/134373.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 4 Apr 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 4 Apr 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.