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Is Suicide Linked to Living at High Altitude?

Is Suicide Linked to Living at High Altitude?

A research review discovers high-altitude areas have increased rates of suicide and depression. In the United States, intermountain states were found to have the highest suicide rate with investigators positing that blood oxygen levels due to low atmospheric pressure may play a factor.

The research appears in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry.

Brent Michael Kious, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Utah, and colleagues explain that additional research may reveal interventions to reduce the effects of low blood oxygen on mood and suicidal thoughts.

In the current study, the researchers reviewed and analyzed previous evidence linking higher altitude of residence to increased risk of suicide and depression. The scientists then considered possible explanations for these associations.

“There are significant regional variations in the rates of major depressive disorder and suicide in the United States, suggesting that sociodemographic and environmental conditions contribute,” Kious and coauthors write.

Twelve studies were analyzed with most performed in the United States. The investigations included population-based data on the relationship between suicide or depression and altitude.

While the studies used varying methods, most reported that higher-altitude areas had increased rates of depression and suicide. In general, the correlation was stronger for suicide than for depression.

The highest suicide rates were clustered in the intermountain states: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. (Alaska and Virginia also had high suicide rates.)

In a 2014 study, the percentage of adults with “serious thoughts of suicide” ranged from 3.3 percent in Connecticut (average altitude 490 feet) to 4.9 percent in Utah (average altitude 6,100 feet).

Other key findings from previous research on altitude and suicide included:

  • Populations living at higher altitudes had increased suicide rates despite having decreased rates of death from all causes. Rather than a steady increase, the studies suggested a “threshold effect”: suicide rates increased dramatically at altitudes between about 2,000 and 3,000 feet;
  • Suicide rates were more strongly associated with altitude than with firearm ownership. Other factors linked to suicide rate included increased poverty rate, lower income, and smaller population ratios of white and divorced women. However, the studies could not account for all factors potentially affecting variations in suicide, such as substance abuse rates and cultural differences;
  • While more than 80 percent of U.S. suicides occur in low-altitude areas, that’s because most of the population lives near sea level. Adjusted for population distribution, suicide rates per 100,000 population were 17.7 at high altitude, 11.9 at middle altitude, and 4.8 at low altitude. Studies from some other countries, but not all, also reported increased suicide rates at higher altitudes.

Why would altitude affect suicide rates? Kious and coauthors suggest the answer might be “chronic hypobaric hypoxia”: low blood oxygen related to low atmospheric pressure.

That theory is supported by studies in animals and short-term studies in humans. The authors suggest two pathways by which hypobaric hypoxia might increase the risks of suicide and depression: by altering the metabolism of the neurotransmitter serotonin and/or; through its effects on brain bioenergetics.

If borne out by future studies, these mechanisms suggest some possible treatments to mitigate the effects of altitude on depression and suicide risk: supplemental 5-hydroxytryptophan (a serotonin precursor) to increase serotonin levels, or creatinine to influence brain bioenergetics.

Indeed, the review identifies several areas in need of further research, including the effects of prolonged exposure to altitude on both serotonin metabolism and brain bioenergetics.

Source: Wolters Kluwer Health/EurekAlert

Is Suicide Linked to Living at High Altitude?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Is Suicide Linked to Living at High Altitude?. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/03/12/is-suicide-linked-to-living-at-high-altitude/133637.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 12 Mar 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 12 Mar 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.