Home » News » Early Menarche May Mean Long-Term Mental Health Problems
Early Menarche May Mean Long-Term Mental Health Problems

Early Menarche May Mean Long-Term Mental Health Problems

It has been well-documented that girls who get their periods earlier than their peers are more psychologically vulnerable as teenagers. That susceptibility can lead to a variety of clinical issues such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and substance abuse, delinquency and failing to complete high school.

Now, new research finds that girls who get their periods earlier than peers are likely to experience depression and antisocial behavior well into adulthood.

The average age at which most girls get their periods is now around 12.5 years old. For the study, Cornell University researchers tracked nearly 8,000 girls from adolescence through their late 20s, greatly expanding the follow-up when compared to similar studies.

“It can be very easy for people to dismiss the emotional challenges that come along with growing up as a girl, and say, ‘Oh, it’s just that age; it’s what everyone goes through,'” said Dr. Jane Mendle, author of the study and associate professor of human development.

“But not everyone goes through it, and it’s not just ‘that age.’ And it’s not trivial. It puts these girls on a path from which it is hard to deviate.”

The researchers found the younger the girl began menstruating, the more likely she was to report symptoms of depression. By the time the study participants were nearly 30 years old, the links between early periods and depression were still clear.

Moreover, the extent of the association was just as strong as it was in adolescence, years before, Mendle said, adding, “To me, that was the most interesting finding: that the effect lingered at the same strength.”

Earlier-maturing girls in the study also reported more frequent antisocial behaviors as teenagers, with more acting out, rule-breaking, and delinquency. And that behavior only got worse as they grew up.

That’s the exact opposite pattern normally developing teens display, Mendle said. “Usually people aren’t shoplifting at 25 as much as they do at 15. … But these kids did not show the typical age-related declines in antisocial behavior, and their behaviors got worse.”

Mendle and her co-authors, Drs. Rebecca Ryan of Georgetown University and Kirsten M.P. McKone of the University of Pittsburgh, analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The nationally representative study tracked 7,800 women for 14 years (1994-2008), starting when they were between 11 and 21 years old.

Researchers asked participants the age at which they began menstruating, if they had symptoms of depression and antisocial behavior, and other factors associated with early puberty and mental health problems, such as household income and whether their father was absent.

The age at which most girls get their periods has become younger and younger over the past 50 years. But an even more dramatic, and worrisome, change has occurred in the younger ages at which girls enter puberty and start to develop breasts, Mendle said. About one-third of American girls are now entering puberty by the age of eight.

Girls who experience puberty earlier than their peers are at risk for mental health problems as teenagers because there’s such a mismatch between how they look and their emotional and cognitive maturity.

“What’s tricky is because they look older, they start to get treated like they’re older. But they still have the internal mental workings of their normal chronological age,” Mendle said.

Furthermore, parents tend to grant them more autonomy. They tend to be the targets of sexual harassment and rumors at school. And it can be hard for these girls to maintain their friendships with others who are maturing at a different rate, she added. “It’s that cumulative effect.”

The study appears in the journal Pediatrics.

Source: Cornell University

Early Menarche May Mean Long-Term Mental Health Problems

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Early Menarche May Mean Long-Term Mental Health Problems. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/03/01/early-menarche-may-mean-long-term-mental-health-problems/133172.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 1 Mar 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 1 Mar 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.