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TV Ads May Induce Kids to Binge on Junk Food

TV Ads May Induce Kids to Binge on Junk Food

Researchers have discovered that teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks.

UK investigators found that incessant TV ads for unhealthy, high calorie food could lead teens to eat more than 500 extra snacks like crisps, biscuits, and fizzy drinks throughout the course of a single year compared to those who watch less TV.

Energy and other carbonated drinks high in sugar, fast food, and chips were some of the foods which were more likely to be eaten by teens who watched a lot of TV with adverts.

The report, based on a YouGov survey, questioned 3,348 young people in the U.K. between the ages of 11-19 on their TV viewing habits and diet.

When teens watched TV without commercials researchers found no link between screen time and likelihood of eating more junk food. This suggests that the advertisements on commercial TV may be driving youngsters to snack on more unhealthy food.

The report is also the biggest ever U.K. study to assess the association of TV streaming on diet.

Researchers found that teens who said they regularly streamed TV shows with ads were more than twice as likely (139 percent) to drink fizzy drinks compared to someone with low advert exposure from streaming TV, and 65 percent more likely to eat more ready meals than those who streamed less TV.

Regularly eating high calorie food and drink — which usually has higher levels of fat and sugar — increases the risk of becoming overweight or obese.

Although not commonly recognized, obesity is the second biggest preventable cause of cancer after smoking, and is linked to 13 types of cancer including bowel, breast, and pancreatic.

Dr. Jyotsna Vohra, a lead author on the study from Cancer Research UK, explains, “This is the strongest evidence yet that junk food adverts could increase how much teens choose to eat. We’re not claiming that every teenager who watches commercial TV will gorge on junk food but this research suggests there is a strong association between advertisements and eating habits.

Vohra believes government regulation should reduce or prevent junk food commercial being shown during programs that are popular with young people, such as talent shows and football matches.

“Our report suggests that reducing junk food TV marketing could help to halt the obesity crisis.”

The Obesity Health Alliance recently published a report which found that almost 60 percent of food and drink adverts shown during programs popular with adults and four to 16 year old’s were for unhealthy foods which would be banned from children’s TV channels.

Professor Linda Bauld, Cancer Research UK’s prevention expert, said, “Obese children are five times more likely to remain obese as adults which can increase their risk of cancer later in life.

Source: Cancer Research UK

TV Ads May Induce Kids to Binge on Junk Food

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2018). TV Ads May Induce Kids to Binge on Junk Food. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/01/17/tv-ads-induce-kids-to-binge-on-junk-food/131346.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 17 Jan 2018
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 17 Jan 2018
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.