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Low Frequency Brain Stimulation Helps Cognition in Parkinson’s Disease

Brain Stimulation May Aid Cognition in Parkinson’s

New research suggests that low frequency stimulation of a deep brain region may be able to improve cognitive function in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). If true, the findings set the stage for the potential of brain stimulation for treating other cognitive diseases.

The new work by neurologists and neurosurgeons at the University of Iowa provides the first direct evidence of a connection in the human brain between the thinking region of the brain and regions associated with controlling movement.

Researchers used rare, intraoperative brain recordings to find the potential links between the frontal cortex of the brain and a deeper structure called the subthalamic nucleus (STN).

The study, found online in the journal Brain, shows that stimulation of the STN at low frequencies improves the performance of PD patients on a simple cognitive task that is usually disrupted by PD.

“It’s not very often that you identify a new connection in the human brain,” said Nandakumar Narayanan, M.D., Ph.D., UI assistant professor of neurology and senior study author.

“The existence of this hyperdirect pathway from the prefrontal cortex to the STN has been bandied about for around a decade, but this is the first time we’ve experimentally shown that it exists and functions in people.

“We were also able to show that if we stimulate the STN, we change the frontal cortical activity and we think it’s by this pathway,” he said. “And if we stimulate the STN and change cortical activity, we can actually change behavior in a beneficial way, improving the patients’ cognitive performance.”

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that affects about one million people in the United States. Deep brain stimulation of the STN at high frequencies is already approved to treat movement problems in some patients with PD.

In addition to causing movement problems, however, PD also affects thinking or cognition. The new findings raise the possibility that STN deep brain stimulation at a different (low) frequency might also improve cognitive symptoms in PD, and possibly even in other neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

In the research, the team was able to map the STN-cortex connection by “listening in” on brain activity during surgeries to implant deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes in patients with PD.

UI neurosurgeon Jeremy Greenlee, M.D., conducts more than 30 such surgeries every year and his expertise was vital to the mapping experiment. Using specialized recording electrodes placed inside the patients’ brains, Greenlee listens in on brain activity in order to accurately place the DBS device.

Those electrodes also allow direct recording of brain activity for experimental purposes in patients who are awake during the procedure without adding any risk. This kind of intraoperative recordings is not very common, but Greenlee and his UI colleagues have a long history of expertise in the technique.

During the surgery, the patients did a simple cognitive task as a way of stimulating one part of the brain while recording electrical activity from other parts that are connected. Listening to the neural activity during the task allowed the team to map the connection.

“We were able to evoke a response to show the functional connection,” Greenlee explains. “The very fast response suggests a single, direct synaptic connection — that is what hyperdirect means.”

Having established the existence of the hyperdirect connection, the researchers next investigated the effect of low frequency STN stimulation on cognitive abilities. Narayanan’s team uses a very simple thinking task — accurately estimating the passage of a short interval of time — to study cognitive impairment in PD patients and animal models of PD.

They discovered stimulation improves cognitive performance.

During post-surgery follow up visits, the researchers had the patients do the interval timing task with the DBS stimulator set to one of three settings: high frequency (normal for controlling movement), no stimulation, or a low frequency setting of 4 Hz. Only the 4 Hz stimulation improved the patients’ performance on the timing test.

The researchers think that the frequencies are like communication channels between networks. If two networks are working together at the same frequency, that might be a unique way that the networks interact and information is transmitted.

Source: University of Iowa/EurekAlert

Brain Stimulation May Aid Cognition in Parkinson’s

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Brain Stimulation May Aid Cognition in Parkinson’s. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/11/29/low-frequency-brain-stimulation-helps-cognition-in-parkinsons-disease/129321.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 29 Nov 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 29 Nov 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.