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Is Autism Associated with Socioeconomic Status

Is Autism Associated with Socioeconomic Status?

Provocative new research discovers children living in neighborhoods where incomes are low and fewer adults have bachelor’s degrees, are less likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to kids from more affluent neighborhoods.

University of Wisconsin-Madison investigators lead the multi-institution study which reviewed if the skewed ASD prevalence was the result of inadequate screening and failure to assign a diagnosis among vulnerable children.

The study appears in the American Journal of Public Health.

Maureen Durkin and her team found that the incidence, or the number of children diagnosed with autism, increased during the study period. In fact, during the eight years of the study, the overall prevalence of ASD in children more than doubled, increasing from 6.6 to 14.7 cases per thousand children. Prevalence pertains to the total number of children who have an ASD diagnosis.

“We wanted to see if part of this increase in ASD prevalence was because advances in screening techniques and medical training meant more children from disadvantaged backgrounds were gaining access to ASD diagnoses and services,” says Durkin, a professor of population health sciences and pediatrics at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“It doesn’t seem that’s the case.”

Her team analyzed education and health care data for 1.3 million eight year-old children from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention population-based surveillance program, with sites in 11 states across the U.S.: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Utah, and Wisconsin.

The study merged this autism surveillance data with U.S. Census measures of socioeconomic status, such as number of adults who have bachelor’s degrees, poverty, and median household incomes in the census tracts studied.

It found that regardless of which indicator of socioeconomic status the researchers used, children living in census tracts with lower socioeconomic development were less likely to be diagnosed with ASD than children living in areas with higher socioeconomic indicators.

While not the first study to highlight socioeconomic differences in rates of autism diagnosis, “the continued increase in prevalence of ASD makes understanding its epidemiology critical to ensure services are reaching the children who need them the most,” says Durkin.

The study does not prove children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are not getting the diagnoses and support they need, Durkin says, but it does indicate that’s the most likely scenario.

In support of this hypothesis, the study found that children who had intellectual disabilities were equally likely to be diagnosed with ASD irrespective of their socioeconomic backgrounds.

That could be because “children with intellectual disabilities usually have developmental delays that get noticed earlier in life,” says Durkin. “They may get referred for comprehensive medical follow-ups, which could then lead to a diagnosis of their ASD as well.”

In addition, studies in Sweden and France — which have universal health care and fewer barriers for citizens to access medical care — found no association between socioeconomic status and rates of autism diagnoses.

These findings collectively support the idea that children living in poorer or less well-educated areas are being diagnosed with ASD at lower rates because they have less access to health care providers who could make the diagnosis and provide needed support.

Durkin and her colleagues are now analyzing data from 2010 to 2016.

“In 2006, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended all children be screened for ASD,” says Durkin. Future research will focus on assessing if more universal screening can lower the socioeconomic gap in ASD prevalence.

That’s important to know, Durkin says, because “if we are under-identifying ASD in certain socioeconomic groups — as seems likely — we need to be prepared to provide services at a higher level to more people. We need to find cost-effective interventions and supports and make sure they are distributed equitably and in a way that reaches everybody who needs them.”

Durkin is working with researchers and clinicians at the Waisman Center to improve access to ASD screening, diagnosis, and care for underserved communities through a federally-funded program called the Wisconsin Care Integration Initiative.

“This program is focused on ‘moving the needle’ to improve access to a coordinated, comprehensive state system of services that leads to early diagnosis and entry into services for children with ASD, particularly for medically underserved populations,” says Durkin.

Source: University of Wisconsin

Is Autism Associated with Socioeconomic Status?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Is Autism Associated with Socioeconomic Status?. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/10/13/is-autism-associated-with-socioeconomic-status/127362.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 14 Oct 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 14 Oct 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.