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TV/Video Games in Bedroom Can Lead to Child Issues

TV/Video Games in Bedroom Can Lead to Child Issues

New research suggests that when a child has a TV or video games in their bedroom, negative consequences may happen.

Iowa State University investigators discovered bedroom access to TV or video games resulted in children spending less time reading, sleeping, or participating in other activities. In turn, these children did not do as well in school and were at greater risk for obesity and video game addiction.

Douglas Gentile, lead author and professor of psychology, says the research shows the location of video access really does matter for kids.

Researchers were able to track the detrimental effects over a period of six months to two years. They also found that children with bedroom media watched programs and played video games that were more violent, which increased levels of physical aggression.

Gentile says it stands to reason that most parents are not fully aware of what is happening behind closed doors.

The study appears in the journal Developmental Psychology.

“When most children turn on the TV alone in their bedroom, they’re probably not watching educational shows or playing educational games,” Gentile said. “Putting a TV in the bedroom gives children 24-hour access and privatizes it in a sense, so as a parent you monitor less and control their use of it less.”

The study utilizes data from Gentile’s previous studies on screen time and media content. The new study found that having bedroom media significantly changes the amount of time children spend with media, and changes the content they view. Moreover, bedroom access also changes what children do not do, such as reading.

Investigators believe some of the new findings are a reflection of the digital media environment.

Several studies have tracked changes in children’s screen time. Gentile says that number continues to trend upward, nearing close to 60 hours a week that children spend in front of screens.

National studies show that more than 40 percent of children, ages four to six, have a TV in their bedroom, and a substantial majority of children eight and older have a TV or video game console in their bedrooms.

While this study looked specifically at TVs and video games in the bedroom, Gentile expects the effects to be the same, if not stronger, given the access children now have to digital devices.

He has talked with parents worried about their child’s digital media use or how best to set limits. Their concerns range from children accessing questionable content to responding in the middle of the night to text messages or social media alerts, he said.

It is a challenge Gentile says he too has faced as a parent, but he encourages others to keep media out of their children’s bedroom. It may cause a battle in the short term, but will benefit children in the long term.

“It’s a lot easier for parents to never allow a TV in the bedroom than it is to take it out,” he said. “It’s a question every parent must face, but there is a simple two-letter answer. That two-letter answer is tough, but it is worth it.”

It may be natural for parents to wonder why a TV in the bedroom is any different from any other room in the home.

Gentile says it comes down to ease of access. There is no direct link between the physical presence of a TV and poor grades. Rather, bedroom media makes it easier for children to spend more time watching or playing, which displaces other beneficial and healthful activities.

For example, researchers tracked children over a period of 13 and 24 months and found bedroom media (both TV and video games) increased total screen time, which indirectly affected school grades.

The data pointed to one explanation — third through fifth grade students who spent more time watching TV, spent less time reading. According to the study, increased screen time was also associated with higher body mass index, physical aggression, and symptoms of video game addiction.

“We know from decades of research on addiction that the No. 1 predictor of addiction is access.

“You can’t be addicted to gambling, if there is no place to gamble,” Gentile said. “Access is certainly the gateway to a wide range of effects, both positive and negative.”

Source: Iowa State University

TV/Video Games in Bedroom Can Lead to Child Issues

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). TV/Video Games in Bedroom Can Lead to Child Issues. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/09/27/tvvideo-games-in-bedroom-can-lead-to-child-issues/126596.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 27 Sep 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 27 Sep 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.