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Long-Term Effect of Antidepressants Questioned

Long-Term Effect of Antidepressants Questioned

Provocative new research suggests antidepressant medications, most commonly prescribed to reduce depression and anxiety, increase the risk of death.

Canadian researchers explain that common antidepressants block the absorption of serotonin by cells in the body. In the brain serotonin affects moods and the antidepressants often improve the way we feel.

However, McMaster University researchers warn that all the major organs of the body — the heart, kidneys, lungs, liver — use serotonin from the bloodstream.

Blocking the absorption of serotonin in these organs by antidepressants could increase the risk of death by preventing multiple organs from functioning properly.

The researchers reviewed studies involving hundreds of thousands of people and found that antidepressant users had a 33 percent higher chance of death than non-users.

Antidepressant users also had a 14 percent higher risk of cardiovascular events, such as strokes and heart attacks. The findings are published in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.

“We are very concerned by these results. They suggest that we shouldn’t be taking antidepressant drugs without understanding precisely how they interact with the body,” says author Paul Andrews, an associate professor at McMaster University who led the research team.

Taken by one in eight adult Americans, antidepressants are among the most frequently used medications. They are often prescribed by family doctors without a formal diagnosis of depression, on the assumption they are safe.

Since depression itself can be deadly — people with depression are at an increased risk of suicide, stroke, and heart attack — many physicians think that antidepressants could save lives by reducing depressive symptoms.

However, McMaster researcher and co-author Marta Maslej, says, “Our findings are important because they undermine this assumption. I think people would be much less willing to take these drugs if they were aware how little is known about their impact outside of the brain, and that what we do know points to an increased risk of death.”

Benoit Mulsant, a psychiatrist at the University of Toronto who was also involved in the study, says the findings point to the need for more research on how antidepressants actually do work.

“I prescribe antidepressants even though I do not know if they are more harmful than helpful in the long-term. I am worried that in some patients they could be, and psychiatrists in 50 years will wonder why we did not do more to find out,” Mulsant says.

Interestingly, the news about antidepressants is not all bad. The researchers found that antidepressants are not harmful for people with cardiovascular diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

This makes sense since these antidepressants have blood-thinning effects that are useful in treating such disorders. Unfortunately, this also means that for most people who are in otherwise good cardiovascular health, antidepressants tend to be harmful.

Source: McMaster University/EurekAlert

Long-Term Effect of Antidepressants Questioned

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Long-Term Effect of Antidepressants Questioned. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/09/15/long-term-effect-of-antidepressants-questioned/126037.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 15 Sep 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 15 Sep 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.