advertisement
Home » News » Incorrect Perception of Social Networks Can Harm
Incorrect Perception of Social Networks Can Harm

Incorrect Perception of Social Networks Can Harm

New research discovers many people feel that they are alone and that they have less friends than their peers. Unfortunately, this perception — which is often incorrect — could negatively affect happiness.

In the study, investigators from the University of British Columbia (UBC), Harvard Business School, and Harvard Medical School discovered new university students consistently think their peers have more friends and spend more time socializing than they do.

Even when that’s untrue, simply believing so affected students’ wellbeing and sense of belonging.

Over the past few decades, health experts have discovered that social support is as important for holistic health as mental and physical health.

“We know the size of your social networks has a significant effect on happiness and wellbeing,” said study lead author Ashley Whillans, assistant professor at Harvard Business School who carried out the research while a Ph.D. candidate at UBC.

“But our research shows that even mere beliefs you have about your peers’ social networks has an impact on your happiness.”

The researchers used data collected from a survey of 1,099 first-year students at UBC. Students were asked how many friends they had made and to estimate how many friends their peers had made since starting school in September.

The researchers found a greater proportion of students (48 percent) believed other students had made more close friends than they did. Thirty-one percent believed the opposite.

A second survey tracking 389 students across their first year found students who believed their peers had more friends at the beginning of the year reported lower levels of wellbeing.

However, several months later, the same students who thought their peers had moderately more friends than they did at the beginning of the year reported making more friends compared to students who thought their peers had many more friends.

“We think students are motivated to make more friends if they think their peers only have one or two more friends than they do,” said Whillans.

“But if they feel like the gap is too big, it’s almost as if they give up and feel it isn’t even worth trying.”

Frances Chen, the study’s senior author, said the public nature of social activities is likely why students feel their peers are doing better socially.

“Since social activities, like eating or studying with others, tend to happen in cafes and libraries where they are easily seen, students might overestimate how much their peers are socializing because they don’t see them eating and studying alone,” said Chen.

The findings could help inform university initiatives to support students’ transition to university life, possibly through an intervention to correct social misperceptions and promote friendship formation, said Chen.

More research is needed to determine whether the same pattern emerges among new immigrants, or people moving to a new city or starting a new job, said Chen.

“These feelings and perceptions are probably the strongest when people first enter a new social environment, but most of us probably experience them at some point in our lives,” she said.

Source: University of British Columbia

Incorrect Perception of Social Networks Can Harm

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Incorrect Perception of Social Networks Can Harm. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/09/15/incorrect-perception-of-social-networks-can-harm/126046.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 15 Sep 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 15 Sep 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.