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Teens Girls Suffer from Digital Dating Abuse

Teens Girls Suffer from Digital Dating Abuse

Researchers at the University of Michigan and University of California-Santa Barbara have found teens experience digital dating abuse at similar rates, but girls reported that they were more upset by these behaviors and reported more negative emotional responses.

Digital dating abuse behaviors include the use of cell phones or the internet to harass, control, pressure, or threaten a dating partner.

“Although digital dating abuse is potentially harmful for all youth, gender matters,” said Dr. Lauren Reed, the study’s lead author and an assistant project scientist at University of California-Santa Barbara.

The study, which will appear in the Journal of Adolescence, involved 703 Midwest high school students who reported the frequency of digital dating abuse, if they were upset by the “most recent” incidents, and how they responded.

Students completed the surveys between December 2013 and March 2014.

Participants reported sending and receiving at least 51 text messages per day, and spending an average of 22 hours per week using social media. Most participants reported that they text/texted their current or most recent dating partner frequently.

The survey asked teens to indicate how often they experienced problematic digital behaviors with a dating partner.

Concerns include being “pressured me to sext” (sending a sexual or naked photo), being sent a threatening message, having private information assessed without permission, and having their whereabouts and activities monitored.

Girls indicated more frequent digital sexual coercion victimization, and girls and boys reported equal rates of digital monitoring and control, and digital direct aggression.

When confronted with direct aggression, such as threats and rumor spreading, girls responded by blocking communication with their partner.

Boys responded in similar fashion when they experienced digital monitoring and control behaviors, the study showed.

Boys often treat girls as sexual objects, which contributes to the higher rates of digital sexual coercion, as boys may feel entitled to have sexual power over girls, said study co-author Dr. Richard Tolman, University of Michigan professor of social work.

Girls, on the other hand, are expected to prioritize relationships, which can lead to more jealousy and possessiveness, he said. Thus, they may be more likely to monitor boys’ activities.

Source: University of Michigan/EurekAlert

Teens Girls Suffer from Digital Dating Abuse

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Teens Girls Suffer from Digital Dating Abuse. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/06/28/teens-girls-suffer-from-digital-dating-abuse/122538.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 28 Jun 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 28 Jun 2017
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