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New Tool Helps Predict Cognitive Deficits in Parkinson’s

New Tool Helps Predict Cognitive Deficits in Parkinson’s

Although Parkinson’s disease (PD) is typically thought of as a movement disorder, approximately 25 percent of patients also experience cognitive deficits.

A newly developed research tool may help predict a patient’s risk for developing dementia and could enable clinical trials aimed at finding treatments to prevent the cognitive effects of the disease.

Investigators at Harvard Medical School and the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital spearheaded development of the computer-based risk calculator.

The research appears in Lancet Neurology.

“By allowing clinical researchers to identify and select only patients at high risk for developing dementia, this tool could help in the design of ‘smarter’ trials that require a manageable number of participating patients,” said corresponding author Clemens Scherzer, M.D., head of the Neurogenomics Lab and Parkinson Personalized Medicine Program.

For the study, the research team combined data from 3,200 people with PD, representing more than 25,000 individual clinical assessments and evaluated seven known clinical and genetic risk factors associated with developing dementia.

From this information, they built the risk calculator that may predict the chance that an individual with PD will develop cognitive deficits.

“This study includes both genetic and clinical assessments from multiple groups of patients, and it represents a significant step forward in our ability to effectively model one of the most troublesome non-motor aspects of Parkinson’s disease,” said researcher Margaret Sutherland, Ph.D.

Currently available medications are effective in improving motor deficits caused by the disease. However, the loss of cognitive abilities severely affects an individual’s quality of life and independence.

One barrier to developing treatments for the cognitive effects of PD is the considerable variability among patients. As a result, researchers must enroll several hundred patients when designing clinical trials to test treatments.

Scherzer and team also noted that a patient’s education appeared to have a powerful impact on the risk of memory loss. The more years of formal education patients in the study had, the greater was their protection against cognitive decline.

“This fits with the theory that education might provide your brain with a ‘cognitive reserve,’ which is the capacity to potentially compensate for some of the disease-related effects,” said Scherzer.

“I hope researchers will take a closer look at this. It would be amazing, if this simple observation could be turned into a useful therapeutic intervention.”

Moving forward, Scherzer and his colleagues from the International Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease Progression (IGPP) Consortium plan to further improve the cognitive risk score calculator.

The team is scanning the genome of PD patients to hunt for new progression genes. Ultimately, it is their hope that the tool can be used in the clinic in addition to helping with clinical trial design. However, considerable research remains to be done before that will be possible.

One complication for the use of this calculator in the clinic is the lack of available treatments for PD-related cognitive deficits. Doctors face ethical issues concerning whether patients should be informed of their risk when there is little available to help them.

It is hoped that by improving clinical trial design, the risk calculator can first aid in the discovery of new PD treatments and determine which patients would benefit most from the new treatments.

“Prediction is the first step,” said Scherzer. “Prevention is the ultimate goal, preventing a dismal prognosis from ever happening.”

Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital

New Tool Helps Predict Cognitive Deficits in Parkinson’s

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). New Tool Helps Predict Cognitive Deficits in Parkinson’s. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 24, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/06/21/new-tool-helps-predict-cognitive-deficits-in-parkinsons/122241.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 21 Jun 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Jun 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.