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Mindfulness In Prenatal Education Can Reduce Risk of Depression

Mindfulness In Prenatal Education Can Reduce Risk of Depression

A new study shows mindfulness training that addresses fear and pain during childbirth can improve women’s childbirth experiences.

Moreover, researchers from researchers at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and the University of California, San Francisco discovered the training was associated with a reduction of depression symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period.

“Fear of the unknown affects us all, and perhaps none more so than pregnant women,” says lead author Dr. Larissa Duncan, University of Wisconsin, Madison professor of human development and family studies.

“With mindfulness skills, women in our study reported feeling better able to cope with childbirth and they experienced improved mental well-being critical for healthy mother-infant adjustment in the first year of life.”

The study also suggests that pregnant women who practice mindfulness may use less medication for pain during labor.

This finding is especially relevant as many women and their healthcare providers are concerned about the use of medications during pregnancy, labor, and while breastfeeding because of the potential risks to infants.

Furthermore, if left untreated, maternal mental health problems also pose a significant risk to infants.

“A mindfulness approach offers the possibility of decreasing the need for these medications and can reach women who may not know they are at risk for perinatal depression or can’t access mental health services,” Duncan said.

The new study appears in the journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. The investigation is a randomized, controlled trial called Prenatal Education About Reducing Labor Stress (PEARLS). The research compares mainstream childbirth education with childbirth education that includes mindfulness skills focused on reducing fear among first-time mothers.

Fear of childbirth has been shown in previous studies to be linked to poorer labor-and-delivery outcomes and to depression.

Although many consider childbirth education classes a primary resource for pregnant women and their partners to learn information and strategies for the birthing process and remedies for coping with labor pain — there is limited data that demonstrates they achieve these goals for the more than two million pregnant women who attend them each year in the United States.

In fact, Duncan says, “sometimes women report that the information in childbirth education actually increases their fear of childbirth.”

In the current pilot study, 30 women and their partners, first-time mothers late in their third trimester of pregnancy were offered either a standard childbirth preparation course lacking a mind-body focus or an intensive weekend workshop called Mind in Labor: Working with Pain in Childbirth.

The workshop was based on the Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting education course developed by study co-author Nancy Bardacke, a certified nurse-midwife and senior mindfulness teacher at University of California, San Francisco.

The program focused on practices like mindful movement, walking meditation, and pain coping strategies. Previous research shows that mindfulness training can be an effective way to manage both chronic and acute pain.

Participants represented a diversity of ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. They completed self-reported assessments before and after taking part in a childbirth education course and after giving birth.

The mindfulness group also received handouts and guided audio materials so they could practice mindfulness on their own. The study team collected medical record data from each woman.

The researchers found a reduction in depression symptoms in the mindfulness group, which continued through their post-birth follow up at approximately six weeks.

In contrast, depression symptoms worsened among women who participated in the standard childbirth education courses.

While mothers in the mindfulness group sought epidurals at similar rates to those in the control group and retrospectively reported similar levels of perceived pain during labor, the study did see a trend toward lower use of opioid-based pain medication during labor.

While these results were not statistically significant, the rate of narcotic use during labor was around 62 percent in the control group and just 31 percent in the mindfulness group. A larger study is needed to better understand this effect.

“The encouraging results of this small study point to the possibility that mindfulness skills can transform the way expectant parents prepare for this profound life change,” says Bardacke.

Source: University of Wisconsin, Madison

Mindfulness In Prenatal Education Can Reduce Risk of Depression

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Mindfulness In Prenatal Education Can Reduce Risk of Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/05/25/mindfulness-in-prenatal-education-can-reduce-risk-of-depression/121055.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 25 May 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 25 May 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.