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Brain Stimulation May Restore Memory Lapses

Brain Stimulation May Restore Memory Lapses

Although early in the research cycle, a team of neuroscientists has shown that electrical stimulation delivered when memory is predicted to fail can improve memory function.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania say this is the first study to show that electrical stimulation can improve memory function in the human brain.

Timing, however, appears to make a big difference as the same stimulation generally becomes disruptive when electrical pulses arrive during periods of effective memory function.

The research team included Michael Kahana, professor of psychology and principal investigator, Youssef Ezzyat, a senior data scientist in Kahana’s lab; and Daniel Rizzuto, director of cognitive neuromodulation at Penn.

Their findings appear in the journal Current Biology.

Experts say the work is an important step toward the long-term goal of Restoring Active Memory, a four-year Department of Defense project aimed at developing next-generation technologies that improve memory function in people who suffer from memory loss.

The study illustrates an important link between appropriately timed deep-brain stimulation and its potential therapeutic benefits.

To get to this point, the Penn team first had to understand and decode signaling patterns that correspond to highs and lows of memory function.

“By applying machine-learning methods to electrical signals measured at widespread locations throughout the human brain,” said Ezzyat, lead paper author, “we are able to identify neural activity that indicates when a given patient will have lapses of memory encoding.”

Using this model, Kahana’s team examined how the effects of stimulation differ during poor versus effective memory function.

The study involved neurosurgical patients receiving treatment for epilepsy at several facilities across the country. Participants were asked to study and recall lists of common words while receiving safe levels of brain stimulation.

During this process, the Penn team recorded electrical activity from electrodes implanted in the patients’ brains as part of routine clinical care. These recordings identified the biomarkers of successful memory function, activity patterns that occur when the brain effectively creates new memories.

“We found that, when electrical stimulation arrives during periods of effective memory, memory worsens,” Kahana said. “But when the electrical stimulation arrives at times of poor function, memory is significantly improved.”

Kahana likens it to traffic patterns in the brain: stimulating the brain during a backup restores the normal flow of traffic.

Gaining insight into this process could improve the lives of many types of patients, particularly those with traumatic brain injury or neurological diseases, such Alzheimer’s.

“Technology based on this type of stimulation,” Rizzuto said, “could produce meaningful gains in memory performance, but more work is needed to move from proof-of-concept to an actual therapeutic platform.”

To foster ongoing research, the Restoring Active Memory (RAM) has publicly released an extensive intracranial brain recording and stimulation dataset that included more than 1,000 hours of data from 150 patients performing memory tasks.

Source: University of Pennsylvania/EurekAlert

Brain Stimulation May Restore Memory Lapses

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Brain Stimulation May Restore Memory Lapses. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/04/21/brain-stimulation-may-restore-memory-lapses/119449.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 21 Apr 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Apr 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.