advertisement
Home » News » Green Spaces May Benefit Aging Brain
Green Spaces May Benefit Aging Brain

Green Spaces May Benefit Aging Brain

Walking between busy urban environments and green spaces triggers changes in levels of excitement, engagement, and frustration in the brain, according to a new study of older people. It is the latest study to document the psychological benefits of natural environments.

Researchers at the Universities of York and Edinburgh in the U.K. say the findings have important implications for architects, planners, and health professionals as we deal with an aging population.

“There are concerns about mental well-being as the global population becomes older and more urbanized,” said research fellow Dr. Chris Neale, of the University of York’s Stockholm Environment Institute. “Urban green space has a role to play in contributing to a supportive city environment for older people through mediating the stress induced by built-up settings.”

The research effort is part of a larger project looking at mobility, mood, and place, and the role of the urban environment in promoting lifelong health and well-being.

The aim of the study was to understand how older people experience different urban environments using electroencephalography (EEG), self-reported measures and interviews.

As part of the experiment, eight volunteers aged 65 and over (from a wider sample of 95 people aged 65 and over) wore a mobile EEG head-set which recorded their brain activity when walking between busy and green urban spaces.

The research team also ran a video of the routes the people walked, asking the participants to describe “snapshots” of how they felt. The volunteers were also interviewed before and after.

The volunteers experienced beneficial effects of green space and preferred it, as it was calming and quieter, the study revealed.

The findings are salient as the population ages and cities grow.

“We found that older participants experienced beneficial effects of green space whilst walking between busy built urban environments and urban green space environments,” Neale said.

“In a time of austerity, when greens spaces are possibly under threat due to pressure on council funding, we have demonstrated that these areas are important to people’s health. We have an aging population which places challenges on the government. As the cost of looking after an aging population continues to rise, maintaining access to green space could be a relatively low cost option for improving mental well-being.”

Dr. Sara Tilley, research fellow from the University of Edinburgh, added, “To help ensure that living longer is a positive experience for everyone, we need evidence-based solutions to support lifelong health and wellbeing.

“These findings — and others from the same project which show how important places are for our personal and cultural memories, and for enabling us to stay connected socially — have implications for the way we design for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities so that going outdoors in younger years becomes a lifelong passion for getting out and about.”

The study is published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Source: University of York

Green Spaces May Benefit Aging Brain

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Green Spaces May Benefit Aging Brain. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/04/11/green-spaces-may-benefit-aging-brain/118948.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Apr 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 11 Apr 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.