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LGBTQ+ individuals Face High Risk of Assault

LGBTQ+ Individuals Face High Risk of Assault

In a sad reflection on our society, new research discovers lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are at high risk for being victims of physical and sexual assault, harassment, bullying, and hate crimes. Moreover, investigators discovered that things really have not changed over the past 20 years.

RTI researchers analyzed two decades worth of published studies on violence and the LGBTQ+ community, which included 102 peer-reviewed papers as well as a few unpublished analyses and non-peer-reviewed papers.

Investigators also carried out a series of focus-group discussions with LGBTQ+ communities in San Francisco; New York City; Durham, North Carolina; and rural Wyoming.

“Our research indicates that LGBTQ+ people face significant danger in their daily lives — and that their victimization affects their education, safety, and health,” said Tasseli McKay, a social scientist at RTI and the study’s lead author.

The researchers found that in a range of studies with LGBTQ+ individuals, victimization experiences are clearly and consistently correlated with a variety of negative outcomes.

Victimization was associated with detrimental behavioral health conditions and suicidality, sexual risk-taking, and HIV status and decreased school involvement and achievement. Such effects are often sustained many years after an event.

The focus groups touched on a variety of topics including bullying, hate crimes, harassment, and violence.

A transgender participant in a focus group held in Durham, North Carolina said, “Once you’ve been read as being a trans person, you check out, they check out. For us it’s safety. For them, it’s discomfort. It’s a heightened stigmatization.”

Researchers discovered that despite a public perception of greater acceptance of LGBTQ+ individuals in present-day society, disparities in victimization have remained the same or increased since the 1990s.

Schools are a special concern. Many LGBTQ+ youth reported being afraid or feeling unsafe at school, and school-based victimization of LGBTQ+ youth was associated with decreased school attendance, poorer school performance, and steeply increased risk of suicide attempts.

Contradicting the common perception of hate-related victimization as being committed by strangers or acquaintances, LGBTQ+ people are often victimized by close family members, particularly their own parents and, for bisexual women, their male partners.

“We need more research to better understand what policies will provide LGBTQ+ youth with safer school and home environments, what resources provide LGBTQ+ people who are victims of violence the best support and how we can ultimately create a larger societal climate that doesn’t tolerate persistent, pervasive, lifelong victimization,” McKay said.

Source: RTI International

LGBTQ+ Individuals Face High Risk of Assault

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). LGBTQ+ Individuals Face High Risk of Assault. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 27, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/03/10/lgbtq-individuals-face-high-risk-of-assault/117439.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 10 Mar 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 10 Mar 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.