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Autistic Traits Persist After Anorexia Recovery

Autistic Traits Persist After Anorexia Recovery

Swedish researchers have determined that women with anorexia display traits associated with autism, even after the eating disorder is under control and they have achieved a normal weight.

It has long been known that individuals with autism have disturbed eating behavior. However, it has been unclear whether typical autistic behavior surrounding food also exists in those with anorexia nervosa.

Now, researchers have found the similarities between anorexia and autism in women are also seen in a part of the brain which process social skills.

“A traditional eating disorder is usually linked to fixation with food and weight, but there are also a large number of other thoughts and behavior in individuals with anorexia nervosa that have previously been considered typical for autism,” said Louise Karjalainen, Ph.D., a psychologist at the Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre in Gothenburg.

In one study, researchers followed 30 women with anorexia nervosa between the ages of 15-25. After a year when their health had generally begun to improve, they still had the negative thought patterns and behavior around food that characterizes individuals with autism.

“Their general eating patterns improved during the follow-up year, but it was specifically noteworthy that they were still at the same level in their autistic behavior in terms of meal times,” said Karjalainen.

For example, a food smell that is unbearable, a dining companion making loud mouth noises or an aversion to the whole idea of eating together with others, could trigger a relapse long after the acute stage of anorexia. Researchers discovered these autistic traits remained even after the body had been nourished and repaired.

“Cognitively, a person functions better once they have regained normal weight from an eating disorder, but the social aspects of meal times were still uncomfortable. They actually also had problems with multi-tasking.

”Cutting food and chewing at the same time was a challenge, and this is something that is also prevalent in individuals with autism,” said Karjalainen.

“The fact that this is hard for patients with anorexia is something that has not previously been noticed or understood. It may be suspected that this partly is to do with the food and weight anxiety, but it was so clear that it is also linked to social factors,” she said.

MRI scans also showed that women in the group had the same changes as women with autism in the parts of the brain linked to social cognition. This is due to thinning of the gray matter just behind the temple area, which was not present in the healthy comparison groups or in men with autism.

“We need to know more in order to understand how this is all linked, but nevertheless it is a highly interesting discovery,” said Karjalainen. She believes the new findings will improve care for anorexics.

“It’s obvious that anorexia care must be food-focused; this is primarily about saving lives, but there are also other key factors in reducing the risk of relapse and to get people healthy at all levels,” she said.

Source: Sahlgrenska Academy

Autistic Traits Persist After Anorexia Recovery

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Autistic Traits Persist After Anorexia Recovery. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/02/06/autistic-traits-persist-after-anorexia-recovery/116104.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Feb 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Feb 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.