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Schizophrenia Can Increase Risk of Diabetes

Schizophrenia Can Increase Risk of Diabetes

Emerging research discovers that people with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes.

UK researchers say the finding holds even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet, and exercise are taken out of the equation.

Schizophrenia is known to be associated with a reduced life expectancy of up to 30 years. This is largely due to physical health disorders such as heart attack or stroke, for which type II diabetes is a major risk factor.

People with long-term schizophrenia are three times more likely than the general population to have diabetes, something which has previously been attributed to poor diet and exercise habits in this group, as well as the use of antipsychotic medication.

The new study, however, examined whether diabetes risk is already present in people at the onset of schizophrenia, before antipsychotics have been prescribed and before a prolonged period of illness that may be associated with poor lifestyle habits (such as poor diet and sedentary behavior).

The research appears in JAMA Psychiatry.

For the study, investigators pooled data from 16 studies comprising 731 patients with a first episode of schizophrenia and 614 people from the general population. They analyzed blood tests from these studies and found that patients with schizophrenia showed higher risk of developing type II diabetes compared with healthy controls.

Specifically, the patients had higher levels of fasting blood glucose, which is a clinical indicator of diabetes risk. The higher the glucose in your blood, the more likely you are to have diabetes as the body cannot efficiently remove glucose into cells where it can be used as fuel.

They also discovered that compared with healthy controls, patients with first episode schizophrenia had higher levels of insulin and increased levels of insulin resistance, again supporting the notion that this group are at higher risk of developing diabetes.

These results remained significant even when analyses were restricted to studies where patients and controls were matched for dietary intake, the amount of regular exercise they engaged in, and ethnic background.

This suggests that the results were not wholly driven by differences in lifestyle factors or ethnicity between the two groups, and may therefore point towards schizophrenia’s direct role in increasing risk of diabetes.

King’s College London investigators explain that several factors could increase the likelihood of developing both conditions, including shared genetic risk and evidence of shared developmental risk factors, such as premature birth and low birth-weight.

It is also thought that the stress associated with developing schizophrenia, which sees levels of the stress hormone cortisol rise, may also contribute to a higher risk of diabetes.

Dr Toby Pillinger, first author of the study, said, ‘The mortality gap between people with schizophrenia and the general population is growing, and there is a need for novel approaches to halt this trend.

Our study highlights the importance of considering physical health at the onset of schizophrenia, and calls for a more holistic approach to its management, combining physical, and mental healthcare.

“Our findings tell us that people with early schizophrenia have already started down the road to developing diabetes, even if they haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes yet.”

Dr Pillinger added, “Given that some antipsychotic drugs may increase the risk of diabetes further, clinicians have a responsibility to select an appropriate antipsychotic at an appropriate dose. Our results also suggest that patients should be given better education regarding diet and physical exercise, monitoring, and, where appropriate, early lifestyle changes and treatments to combat the risk of diabetes.”

Professor Oliver Howes, senior author of the study adds, “These findings are a wake-up call that we need to rethink the link between diabetes and schizophrenia and start prevention right from the onset of schizophrenia. It is a case of thinking mind and body right from the start.”

Source: King’s College London

Schizophrenia Can Increase Risk of Diabetes

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2017). Schizophrenia Can Increase Risk of Diabetes. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/01/13/schizophrenia-can-increase-risk-of-diabetes/115084.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 13 Jan 2017
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 13 Jan 2017
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.