advertisement
Home » News » Teenage Weight Problems May Influence Midlife Mental Health
Teenage Weight Problems May Influence Midlife Mental Health

Teenage Weight Problems May Influence Midlife Mental Health

It is a sad reality that being overweight or obese is prevalent among teens as well as adults. Currently, a third of the adolescent population in many developed countries are overweight or obese.

While it is well known that teen obesity can lead to a bevy of physical health issues, new research suggests problems with weight during adolescence, coupled with social economic status and physical development, can also impact mental health during adulthood.

To shed light on this issue, scientists at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine set out to determine the association between cumulative life course burden of high-ranked body mass index (BMI), and cognitive function in midlife.

The research, which will appear in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease 55(3), was led by Prof. Jeremy Kark from the Braun School, in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Faculty of Medicine, working with colleagues in Israel and the United States.

Investigators used weight and height data from 507 individuals tracked from over 33 years starting at age 17. The participants completed a computerized cognitive assessment at ages 48-52, and their socioeconomic position was assessed by multiple methods.

Using mixed models (quantitative and qualitative research) the researchers calculated the life-course burden of BMI from age 17 to midlife. They then used statistical methods to assess associations of BMI and height with global cognition and its component domains.

“In this population-based study of a Jerusalem cohort, followed longitudinally from adolescence for over 33 years, we found that higher BMI in late adolescence and the long-term cumulative burden of BMI predicted poorer cognitive function later in life.

“Importantly, this study shows that an impact of obesity on cognitive function in midlife may already begin in adolescence, independently of changes in BMI over the adult life course,” said the paper’s senior author, Prof. Jeremy Kark of the Hebrew University-Hadassah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine.

The effect of obesity on cognitive decline in adulthood was also associated with physical development.

“Our results also show that taller stature was associated with better global cognitive function, independent of childhood and adult socioeconomic position, and that height increase in late adolescence, reflecting late growth, conferred a protective effect, but among women only,” added Irit Cohen-Manheim, doctoral candidate at the Braun School and lead author.

Moreover, the researchers point out that while socioeconomic position may have a particularly important role in the trajectory of a person’s lifetime cognitive function, it has rarely been adequately taken into account.

“To the best of our knowledge, the association between BMI and cognition as a function of childhood and adult socioeconomic position has not been previously reported. Childhood household socioeconomic position appears to strongly modify the association between adolescent BMI and poorer cognition in midlife, the inverse association being restricted to low childhood socioeconomic position,” said Prof. Kark.

“Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that childhood living conditions, as reflected also by height, infuence cognitive function later in life. However, our study is unique in showing that an adverse association of higher BMI with cognitive function appears to begin in adolescence and that it appears to be restricted to adults with lower childhood socioeconomic position,” said Prof. Kark.

“Evidence for the association between impaired cognitive function in midlife and subsequent dementia supports the clinical relevance of our results. Findings of the relation of BMI in adolescence with poorer midlife cognitive status, particularly in light of the ongoing epidemic of childhood obesity, require confirmation,” said Irit Cohen-Manheim.

Source: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem/EurekAlert

Teenage Weight Problems May Influence Midlife Mental Health

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Teenage Weight Problems May Influence Midlife Mental Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/12/09/teenage-weight-problems-may-influence-midlife-mental-health/113639.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 9 Dec 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 9 Dec 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.