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Subtle Signs May Lead to More Precise ADHD Diagnosis

Subtle Signs May Lead to More Precise ADHD Diagnosis

Researchers are making progress toward characterizing different subgroups of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Experts believe this differentiation could aid in determining optimal treatment options for patients based on their specific symptom profile.

In a new study, Penn State investigators discovered young adults diagnosed with ADHD may display subtle physiological signs that could lead to a more precise diagnosis.

Specifically, researchers discovered young adults with ADHD, when performing a continuous motor task, had more difficulty inhibiting a motor response compared to young adults who did not have ADHD. The participants with ADHD also produced more force during the task compared to participants without ADHD.

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common childhood disorder that can continue to affect up to 65 percent of these children as they become adults, according to the researchers.

“A large group of individuals have the label ‘ADHD,’ but present with different symptoms,” said Dr. Kristina A. Neely, assistant professor of kinesiology.

“One of the goals of our ADHD research is to discover unique physiological signals that may characterize different subgroups of the disorder.”

Previous studies have shown that some individuals with ADHD may have poor control of their motor systems, but until recently, the way that it was measured was not very sensitive.

“In previous tasks, motor and cognitive function was evaluated with a key-press response: You hit the button or you didn’t,” said Neely.

“We measure precisely how much force an individual is producing during a continuous motor task. This type of task provides us with more information than the dichotomous ‘yes/no’ response.”

In a recent study using a continuous motor task, participants produced force with their index finger and thumb in response to cues on a visual display.

Participants were instructed to produce force when the visual cue was any color except blue. In the “blue” trials, participants were told to withhold force production.

Neely and colleagues found that participants with ADHD symptoms produced more force on trials when they were told to withhold a response, compared to those without ADHD.

Further, the amount of force that was produced during these trials was correlated with specific ADHD-related symptoms. The researcher was presented at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting.

“The use of a precise and continuous motor task provides a more nuanced understanding of inhibitory control, compared to a button-press task,” said Neely.

“We found that young adults with ADHD produced more force on the ‘blue’ trials compared to young adults without ADHD. And the amount of force produced was related to self-report of ADHD-related symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Moving forward, we will manipulate the parameters of our force-production task to determine which aspects of motor control are related to specific symptoms.”

Source: Pennsylvania State

Subtle Signs May Lead to More Precise ADHD Diagnosis

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Subtle Signs May Lead to More Precise ADHD Diagnosis. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/11/17/advances-in-defining-sub-groups-of-adhd/112665.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 17 Nov 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 17 Nov 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.