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Ruminating on Work-Family Conflict Can Damage Health

Ruminating on Work-Family Conflict Can Damage Health

It is not uncommon for a person to experience conflicts betweeen work and personal life. However, when the issues lead to thinking about the issues over and over, the resultant stress is likely to damage both physical, and mental health.

In a new study, Oregon State University (OSU) researchers followed more than 200 people and discovered that “repetitive thought,” was a pathway between work-family conflict and negative outcomes in six different health categories.

As the term suggests, repetitive thought regarding work-family conflict refers to thinking repeatedly and attentively about the parts of your job and your personal life that clash with each other; for example, that late-afternoon meeting that prevents you from attending your son’s baseball game. It’s a maladaptive coping strategy that impedes daily recovery from stress.

Dr. Kelly D. Davis of OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences was the lead author on the project Davis. She believes repetitive thought over work-family conflict keeps the stressor active and thus gets in the way of recovery.

The study involved 203 adults ages 24 to 76. Each was in a romantic relationship, and roughly two-thirds had at least one child at home. Study results, which appear in the journal Stress & Health, showed a link between repetitive thought and negative outcomes in the health categories of life satisfaction, positive affect, negative affect, fatigue, perceived health, and health conditions.

Positive affect is the extent to which a person subjectively experiences positive moods, and negative affect is the extent to which someone experiences negative moods.

In this study, health conditions referred to a list of 22 conditions or problems, such as stroke or diabetes. Participants were scored based on how many times they answered yes.

In the category of perceived health, participants were asked to rate their health on a five-point scale.

“The main objective of this study was to test a conceptual model in which repetitive thought explained the association between work-family conflict and health,” Davis said.

“There was support for repetitive thought as a mediator in the association between work-family conflict and all six health outcomes.”

Repetitive thought is related to two other types of cognition that also can have adverse effects on health: rumination and worry.

Rumination is persistent, redundant thinking that usually looks backward and is associated with depression; worry is also persistent, redundant thinking but tends to look forward and is typically more associated with anxious apprehension.

“Practitioners can assist individuals facing the dual demands of work and family by reducing repetitive thought, and the related issues of worry and rumination,” Davis said.

One technique that can help is mindfulness; intentionally paying attention to the present-moment experience, such as physical sensations, perceptions, affective states, thoughts, and imagery, in a nonjudgmental way.

“You stay in the moment and acknowledge what you are feeling, recognize that those are real feelings, and process them, putting things in perspective,” Davis said.

Work-family conflict is not just a women’s issue or even just a parent’s issue, Davis said, given the number of workers who are caring for their own mother and/or father.

“Planning ahead and having a backup plan, having a network to support one another, those things make you better able to reduce work-family conflict,” she said.

Source: Oregon State University

Ruminating on Work-Family Conflict Can Damage Health

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Ruminating on Work-Family Conflict Can Damage Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/11/11/continually-thinking-about-work-family-conflict-can-damage-health/112383.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Nov 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 11 Nov 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.