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Brain Composition May Influence Substance Abuse in Bipolar Teens

Brain Composition May Influence Substance Abuse in Bipolar Teens

New research has discovered adolescents suffering from bipolar disorder are more likely to develop substance use disorders if they have lower gray matter volume in the brain.

Investigators believe the finding is important as clinicians can use the knowledge to design tailored interventions for those at higher risk.

Bipolar and substance use disorders often develop together in adolescence, and this co-occurrence increases the risk of adverse outcomes such as suicide, explains Dr. Hilary Blumberg, senior author of the study.

“This study provides the first insight into the regulatory brain systems that may underlie this elevated risk,” added lead author Dr. Elizabeth Lippard.

Importantly, the investigators also found that the gray matter reductions had different patterns in females and males.

“Our findings provide further evidence that sex matters in neuroscience research and demonstrate the importance of examining differences between girls and boys, women and men,” said co-author Dr. Carolyn Mazure.

“We don’t know what we don’t study. And what we don’t know can’t be used to help others.”

“It is critical to continue to work to understand sex differences in the development of brain pathways to these disorders to improve early detection, treatment, and prevention,” Blumberg said.

The study is part of a Journal of Neuroscience Research issue dedicated entirely to sex differences at all levels of the brain, from the genetic and epigenetic level, to the synaptic, cellular, and systems levels.

Source: Wiley/EurekAlert

Brain Composition May Influence Substance Abuse in Bipolar Teens

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Brain Composition May Influence Substance Abuse in Bipolar Teens. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/11/11/brain-composition-may-influence-substance-abuse-in-bipolar-teens/112380.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 11 Nov 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 11 Nov 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.