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Physical Activity Can Improve Function During Early Alzheimer’s

Physical Activity Can Improve Function During Early Alzheimer’s

While the benefit of physical activity to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is well-established, a new study finds that physical activity can also improve function among people with AD.

In the research, University of Kansas (KU) investigators wanted to know if prescribed activity could help people who already have AD, function better.

“Physical activity is very important for brain function,” said Amber Watts, assistant professor of clinical psychology at the University of Kansas.

“We know that people who are physically active are less likely to develop AD. But we also know that for people already living with AD, physical activity can help them function better, decline more slowly and help them with symptoms like agitation, wandering, and sleeplessness.”

According to Watts, too little is known about patterns of activity for people experiencing the early stages of AD. For instance, researchers have lacked useful data about how the progression of the disease itself plays a role in diminishing day-to-day physical activity.

“Part of the issue is they’re a difficult population to study,” she said. “It’s mostly assumed that they’re not active, that they don’t engage in physical activity, but our research showed people in early stages of AD are capable of being active — they just need assistance.”

In the new study Watts, who researches health behaviors, prevention strategies and bio-behavioral processes tied to cognitive decline and dementia, wanted to know if there were differences in physical activity between the two groups.

Watts built upon her previous research that used state-of-the-art accelerometers to track daily physical activity of healthy people and those in the early stage of AD.

“In researching physical activity, people in the past have collected data using body-worn devices like Fitbit and accelerometers that collect data every second,” Watts said.

“But instead of using all the data, they’ve summed it into one score over the entire time the person was wearing the device. What we’ve done is look at variability in physical activity over course of the entire day. This may help us to customize interventions, and it may help us to understand disrupted sleep cycles as well.”

In the new study Watts and colleague Vijay R. Varma of the National Institute on Aging, analyzed daily physical activity of 92 volunteers with and without AD at KU’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center in Kansas City.

Participants wore Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers for a week.

“We found people with AD have different daily patterns of activity than people without AD,” Watts said.

“They spend less time in moderate-intensity activity. But it has to do with time of day. They’re a lot less active in the morning, when most people are at the peak of activity — and that may influence caregivers and people who are trying to help people with dementia.”

The KU researcher said understanding this different daily pattern in physical activity could be key to designing interventions and improving sleep for people with early AD, perhaps by targeting more physical activity in morning.

Watts said the kinds of physical activity found to be helpful to people with AD might be as simple as finding time to walk around the neighborhood. Her past research includes studies on the benefits of walkable communities for older adults.

“Walking is actually the best thing,” she said. “It’s low risk, it’s safe, anyone can do it, it doesn’t require specific equipment, it can be done anywhere. There are other light-intensity activities like stretching, tai chi, household chores, gardening, walking around the mall — those are also beneficial. People with AD don’t have to go to the gym, they just need to do something that keeps them moving and keeps them from sitting continuously.”

AD is often associated with physical activity limitations because individuals have difficulty with “motor planning”. That is, individuals with AD are limited in their ability to plan what movements they will do. Ironically, most individuals have normal gross motor function but problems with deciding what to do.

“There’s an interaction between cognitive features and motor features. If you have difficulty with cognition, you have trouble with motor function. For instance, if you want to walk, but fear getting lost, you are reluctant because you need cognition to guide motor behavior. In early stages of AD, people are still high functioning physically, but they perceive it’s more difficult to get physically active.”

“There will be hundreds who wear accelerometers for two weeks at a time, collecting data, and we’ll look at both sleep and physical activity,” Watts said.

“So we’re continuing this line of research to find out more. We’re especially interested in how nighttime sleep and daytime activity levels interact and influence one another.”

Source: University of Kansas

Physical Activity Can Improve Function During Early Alzheimer’s

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Physical Activity Can Improve Function During Early Alzheimer’s. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/11/10/physical-activity-can-improve-function-during-early-alzheimers/112336.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 10 Nov 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 10 Nov 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.