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For Kids, More Time on Digital Devices = Less Homework Completed

For Kids, More Time on Digital Devices = Less Homework Completed

New research finds that the more time children spend using digital devices, the less likely they are to finish their homework, complete other tasks, or display interest in learning new things. Moreover, the more digital media time, the more difficult it is for kids to remain calm when challenged.

Although the finding is not a surprise to most parents, the research provides detail on the direct relationship between time on digital media — be it watching TV, using computers, playing video games, using tablets and smartphones, or using other digital media devices for purposes other than school work — and homework completion.

Researchers determined children who spent two to four hours a day using digital devices outside of schoolwork had 23 percent lower odds of always or usually finishing their homework, compared to children who spent less than two hours consuming digital media.

The abstract was presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2016 National Conference & Exhibition in San Francisco.

For the study, pediatricians from Brown University School of Public Health in Rhode Island analyzed children’s use of digital media to better understand how it relates to childhood “flourishing,” or overall positive well-being. This characteristic was measured by behaviors and characteristics including diligence, initiative, task completion, and interpersonal relationships.

Investigators used data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children’s Health to analyze the media use and homework habits of more than 64,000 children ages six to 17 years, as reported by their parent or guardian.

When examining children’s use of digital media, researchers found 31 percent were exposed to less than two hours of digital media per day.

Another 36 percent used digital media for two to four hours per day; 17 percent were exposed to four to six hours; and 17 percent were exposed to six or more hours of digital media per day.

For every additional two hours of combined digital media use per day, there was a statistically significant decrease in the odds of always or usually completing homework.

Children who spent four to six hours on digital media had 49 percent lower odds of always or usually finishing their homework than those with less than two hours per day. Those with six or more hours of media use had 63 percent lower odds of always or usually finishing their homework compared to children who spent less than two hours per day using media.

The authors found a similar relationship between digital media exposure and four other measures of childhood flourishing, including always or usually caring about doing well in school, completing tasks that are started, showing interest in learning new things, and staying calm when faced with challenges.

The trends all remained significant regardless of the child’s age group, sex, or family income level.

Prior studies have shown a wide variety of negative health and behavioral consequences of digital media exposure. This study adds to what is already known by showing that digital media exposure is associated with decreased measures of overall child well-being.

“It is important for parents and caregivers to understand that when their children are exposed to multiple and different forms of digital media each day, the combined total digital media exposure is associated with decreases in a variety of childhood well-being,” said study author Stephanie Ruest, M.D., F.A.A.P.

“Parents should consider these combined effects when setting limits on digital media devices.”

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics

For Kids, More Time on Digital Devices = Less Homework Completed

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). For Kids, More Time on Digital Devices = Less Homework Completed. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/10/24/for-kids-more-time-on-digital-devices-less-homework-completion/111554.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 24 Oct 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 24 Oct 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.