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Exercise After Study Can Boost Memory

Exercise After Study Can Boost Memory

New research suggest memory retention can be improved if a person exercises after a study session.

Investigators from the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria say a student’s choice of activity after a period of learning — such as cramming for an exam — has a direct effect on their ability to remember information.

They explain that students should do moderate exercise like running rather than taking part in a passive activity such as playing computer games if they want to make sure they remember what they learned.

The study is published in the journal Cognitive Systems Research.

“I had kids in an age where computer games started to be of high interest,” said Dr. Harald Kindermann, lead author and professor at the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria.

“I wanted to find out how this — and hence the increasing lack of exercise in fresh air — impacts their ability to memorize facts for school.”

In the study, Kindermann and his colleagues asked 60 men aged 16-29 to memorize a range of information, from learning a route on a city map to memorizing German-Turkish word pairs. They were then split into three groups: One group played a violent computer game, one went for a run, and one (the control group) spent time outside.

The researchers compared how well the people in each group remembered the information they were given.

The results showed that the runners performed best, remembering more after the run than before. Those in the control group fared slightly worse, and the memories of people who played the game were significantly impaired.

“Our data demonstrates that playing a video game is not helpful for improving learning effects,” Kindermann added. “Instead it is advisable for youngsters, and most probably for adults too, to do moderate exercise after a learning cycle.”

Investigators believe many complex factors influence this effect.

The stress hormone cortisol is known to have an impact on our memory retention: in some circumstances it helps us remember things, and in others it impairs our memory. There are two types of stress in this sense, psychological and physical, and it could be that substances released by a physical stress like running improve memory retention.

The researchers had two main hypotheses. First, it could be that violent computer games trick the brain into believing it is under real physical threat. This, combined with the psychological stress of gameplay, means that the brain focuses on these perceived threats, and rejects any information it has just learned.

Alternatively, their second hypothesis was that the physical stress of running switches the brain into “memory storage mode” where it retains the information the student wants to remember.

During moderate exercise like running, the body produces more cortisol to keep the body’s systems in balance while it’s under physical stress. It’s this cortisol that could help improve memory. However, the link between cortisol levels and memory retention is uncertain, so further research is needed.

Kindermann and the team now plan to extend this study and investigate the effects of violent computer games and other post-study activities on long-term memory.

Source: Elsevier/EurekAlert

Exercise After Study Can Boost Memory

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Exercise After Study Can Boost Memory. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/10/20/exercise-after-study-improves-memory/111390.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 20 Oct 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 20 Oct 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.