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Mental Math May Improve Emotional Health

Mental Math May Improve Emotional Health

New research suggests that engaging a specific part of the brain during mental math exercises may benefit emotional health.

The finding is a result of a brain-scanning study conducted by neuroscience researches at Duke University. Study results appear in the journal Clinical Psychological Science.

The research takes a preliminary step toward developing new brain training strategies to stave off depression and anxiety. Although the relationship between math and emotion needs further study, the new findings may also lead to new tests gauging the effectiveness of psychological therapies.

“Our work provides the first direct evidence that the ability to regulate emotions like fear and anger reflects the brain’s ability to make numerical calculations in real time,” said Matthew Scult, a neuroscience graduate student in the lab of the study’s senior investigator, Dr. Ahmad Hariri.

Although they may seem unrelated, doing “cold” calculations and regulating “hot” emotions both rely on similar mental gymnastics: the ability to manipulate and update information. Researchers have long speculated about the link between the two.

In the new study, Hariri’s group analyzed brain activity of 186 undergraduates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they were doing math problems from memory.

The students are participants in the ongoing Duke Neurogenetics Study. This investigation is exploring relationships between genes, the brain, and mental health.

In addition to the scans, participants completed questionnaires and interviews assessing their mental health status and emotional coping strategies.

Memory-based math problems stimulate a region of the brain called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which has already been linked to depression and anxiety. Studies have found, for example, that higher activity in this area is associated with fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Cognitive behavioral therapy, which teaches individuals how to re-think negative situations, has also been seen to boost activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

In the current study, the more active a person’s dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was while performing mental math, the more likely he or she was to report being able to adapt their thoughts about emotionally difficult situations.

“We don’t know for sure why that is, but it fit into our hypothesis that the ability to do these more complex math problems might allow you to more readily learn how to think about complex emotional situations in different ways,” Scult said. “It is easy to get stuck in one way of thinking.”

Greater activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex also was associated with fewer depression and anxiety symptoms. The difference was especially obvious in people who had been through recent life stressors, such as failing a class.

Participants with higher dorsolateral prefrontal activity were also less likely to have a mental illness diagnosis.

It is still unclear whether more actively engaging the brain area with math exercises would lead to better emotional coping strategies or the other way around. The researchers plan to collect the same type of data over a longer time period, to see whether one observation precedes the other.

“We hope, with these and future studies, that we can inform new strategies to help people regulate their emotions, and to prevent symptoms of anxiety and depression from developing in the first place,” Scult said.

Source: Duke University

Mental Math May Improve Emotional Health

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Mental Math May Improve Emotional Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/10/13/mental-math-may-improve-emotional-health/111084.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 13 Oct 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 13 Oct 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.