Home » Disorders » Depression » Mouse Study Shows How Environment Can Impact Antidepressant Effect
Mouse Study Suggests Environment Influences Antidepressants

Mouse Study Shows How Environment Can Impact Antidepressant Effect

Pharmacological therapy for depression often includes prescribing a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or SSRI. And while there are six common SSRIs, no one knows in advance whether one or the other will be effective.

Now, a group of European researchers has developed a new theory of SSRI action, and tested it in stressed mice. Investigators believe their results show why our circumstances may influence whether an antidepressant works or not.

The research findings were presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) conference in Vienna.

According to researcher Dr. Silvia Poggini (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome), “There is no doubt that antidepressants work for many people, but for between 30 and 50 percent of depressed people, antidepressants don’t work. No-one knows why. This work may explain part of the reason.”

The researchers have proposed that simply increasing the levels of serotonin, by taking an SSRI, does not cause a recovery from depression, but puts the brain into a condition where change can take place. They believe the medication increases the plasticity of the brain, making it more open to being changed.

“In a certain way it seems that the SSRIs open the brain to being moved from a fixed state of unhappiness, to a condition where other circumstances can determine whether or not you recover,” said Poggini. According to the researchers, it is the environmental conditions you find yourselves in at the time of the treatment which determines whether you are likely to get better or worse.

To test this, they took a sample of mice which they subjected to stress for two weeks. They started treating the mice with the SSRI fluoxetine, and split the group. They continued to stress half (n=12) of the group of mice but the other half of the mice were subjected to a more comfortable environment.

They then tested all the mice to measure the levels of the stress-related cytokines in the brain. Cytokines are protein-related molecules which aid cell to cell communication in the immune system.

They found that mice kept in a more comfortable environment showed an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased anti-inflammatory-related genes. These mice also showed fewer signs of depression, whereas those under continuous stress showed the opposite effect (i.e. a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines, and an increase in anti-inflammatory gene expression, with more signs of depression).

The fluoxetine-treated mice exposed to the comfortable environment showed a 98 percent increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β while mice kept in a stressed environment and treated with fluoxetine showed a 30 percent decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α.

This indicates that the environment determines the response to antidepressants.

“This work indicates that simply taking an SSRI is probably not enough. To use an analogy, the SSRIs put you in the boat, but a rough sea can determine whether you will enjoy the trip. For an SSRI to work well, you may need to be in a favorable environment. This may mean that we have to consider how we can adapt our circumstances, and that antidepressant treatment would only be one tool to use against depression,” said Poggini.

She cautioned, “Our studies have a number of limitations. First of all, we are not explaining the complete range of actions of SSRIs. It’s also an animal model, so clinical and epidemiological studies are needed to further test the validity of the hypothesis. Our results are preliminary and we strongly recommend that patients stick to the treatment prescribed by their doctors.”

Source: ECNP/AlphaGalileo

Mouse Study Shows How Environment Can Impact Antidepressant Effect

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Mouse Study Shows How Environment Can Impact Antidepressant Effect. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/09/21/mouse-study-suggests-environment-influences-antidepressants/110172.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 21 Sep 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 21 Sep 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.