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Improve Care for Borderline Personality Disorders

Improve Care for Borderline Personality Disorders

Although researchers are gaining new insights into the neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD), experts believe improved diagnosis and management of the psychiatric condition is sorely needed.

To that end, a scientific and clinical research update on BPD is presented a special issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry.

The special issue comprises seven papers, contributed by experts in the field, providing an integrated overview of research and clinical management of BPD.

“We hope these articles will help clinicians understand their BPD patients, encourage more optimism about their treatability, and help set a stage from which the next generation of mental health professionals will be more willing to address the clinical and public health challenges they present,” say Drs. Lois Choi-Kain and John Gunderson.

Experts explain that although the diagnostic criteria for BPD are well-accepted, it continues to be a misunderstood and sometimes neglected condition. In fact, experts content that many psychiatrists actively avoid making the diagnosis.

Borderline personality disorder accounts for nearly 20 percent of psychiatric hospitalizations and outpatient clinic admissions, but only three percent of the research budget of the National Institute of Mental Health.

In the special edition, the Guest Editors seek to explain the importance of PBD within the pubiloc health sector and improve the attention received by psychiatry.

Highlights include:

  • A research update on the neurobiology of BPD. Evidence suggests that chronic stress exposure may lead to changes in brain metabolism and structure, thus affecting the processing and integration of emotion and thought. This line of research might lead to new approaches for managing BPD — possibly including early intervention to curb the neurobiological responses to chronic stress.
  • The urgent need for earlier intervention. A review highlights the risk factors, precursors, and early symptoms of BPD and mood disorders in adolescence and young adulthood. While the diagnosis of BPD may be difficult to make during this critical period, evaluation and services are urgently needed.
  • The emergence of evidence-based approaches for BPD. While these approaches have raised hopes for providing better patient outcomes, they require a high degree of specialization and treatment resources. A stepped-care approach to treatment is proposed, using generalist approaches to milder and initial cases of BPD symptoms, progressing to more intensive, specialized care based on clinical needs.
  • The critical issue of BPD in the psychiatric emergency department. This is a common and challenging situation in which care may be inconsistent or even harmful. A clinical vignette provides mental health professionals with knowledge and insights they can use as part of a “caring, informed, and practical” approach to helping BPD patients in crisis.

The special issue also addresses the critical issue of medical residency training. Experts believe more attention is necessary to prepare the next generation of mental health professionals to integrate research evidence into more effective management for patients and families affected by BPD.

Drs. Choi-Kain and Gunderson add, “For clinicians, educators, and researchers, we hope this issue clarifies an emerging basis for earlier intervention, generalist approaches to care for the widest population, and a more organized approach to allocating care for individuals with BPD.”

Source: Wolters Kluwer Health/EurekAlert

Improve Care for Borderline Personality Disorders

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Improve Care for Borderline Personality Disorders. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/09/09/improve-care-for-borderline-personality-disorders/109631.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 9 Sep 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 9 Sep 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.