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Social Media Aids Decision-Making when Breast Cancer

Social Media Aids Decision-Making with Breast Cancer

A new study finds that social media provides a solution for many women as they confront difficult decisions after a diagnosis of breast cancer.

Nevertheless, barriers to use of social media persist.

Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center discovered women who engaged on social media after a breast cancer diagnosis expressed more deliberation about their treatment decision and more satisfaction with the path they chose.

But the researchers found significant barriers to social media for some women, particularly older women, those with less education, and minorities.

“Our findings highlight an unmet need in patients for decisional support when they are going through breast cancer treatment,” says lead study author Lauren P. Wallner, Ph.D., MPH.

“But at this point, leveraging social media and online communication in clinical practice is not going to reach all patients. There are barriers that need to be considered,” she adds.

Researchers surveyed 2,460 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer about their use of email, texting, social media, and web-based support groups following their diagnosis. Women were identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.

The study appears inĀ JAMA Oncology.

The multiple communication channels associated with Social Media aided engagement. Overall, 41 percent of women reported some or frequent use of online communication.

Texting and email were most common, with 35 percent of women using it. Twelve percent of women reported using Facebook, Twitter or other social media sites, and 12 percent used web-based support groups.

“Women reported separate reasons for using each of these modalities. Email and texting were primarily to let people know they had been diagnosed. They tended to use social media sites and web-based support groups to interact about treatment options and physician recommendations,” Wallner says.

“Women also reported using all of these outlets to deal with the negative emotions and stress around their breast cancer diagnosis. They’re using these communications to cope,” she says.

Online communication was more common in younger women and those with more education. Use also varied by race, with 46 percent of white women and 43 percent of Asian women reporting frequent use, compared to 35 percent of black women and 33 percent of Latinas.

The researchers also found that women who frequently used online communication had more positive feelings about their treatment decision. They were more likely to report a deliberate decision and more likely to be highly satisfied with their decision.

Despite these benefits, the study authors urge caution.

“For some women, social media may be a helpful resource. But there are still questions to answer before we can rely on it as a routine part of patient care,” Wallner says.

“We don’t know a lot about the type of information women are finding online. What are they sharing and what is the quality of that information? We need to understand that before we can really harness the potential of social media to better support patients through their cancer treatment and care.”

Source: University of Michigan/EurekAlert

Social Media Aids Decision-Making with Breast Cancer

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Social Media Aids Decision-Making with Breast Cancer. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2016/07/29/social-media-aids-decision-making-when-breast-cancer/107842.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 29 Jul 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 29 Jul 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.